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Rescue My Renovation

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http://boards.diynetwork.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/960107171/m/4033909477

Oct 30, 2013, 07:24 PM
Black Thumbs
Rescue My Renovation
DIY has a couple of shows about making right what previous contractors have done wrong. What some of these contractors did is down right criminal. How about identifying those contractors by name and letting us know if the homeowner ever got any repayment from the contractor if the the contractor had criminal charges pressed against them. This kind of closing the loop would be very interesting. It would also save other people from using the same unscrupulous contractors in the future.
Oct 30, 2013, 09:40 PM
Jaybee
Great concept, but you'll never see it happen. Publicizing name and contact information on air would open DIY up to endless liability issues. Even if there is no doubt that there was a problem and even if the bad contractor was truly bad, there are always two sides to every story. All it would take would be a few on-air accusations proven wrong in court and even a 'bad' contractor could walk away with millions in damages. Add to that the fact that bad remodels can be caused by bad contractors, bad homeowners or just bad luck. Most often its a combination of all, although the most obvious bad guy is the contractor.

Because of liability issues, all TV shows have some very strict rules to follow. First and foremost is that ANYONE shown on-air has signed a release giving permission to show their image and tell their story on-air. There are no exceptions to this. Even the people in reality TV who look bad - the spouse who is cheating, the guy getting arrested by the cops - all of them - have signed a release. Any one who doesn't either doesn't get on the final cut or has their features blurred out. People will sign releases in exchange for payment and in most cases, for the chance to be "on TV".

For a different idea, I'd love to see a show where they highlight projects from good contractors. I think it would be a great concept to show innovative construction, positive interaction with clients and just bottom-line honest and skilled craftsmen. But I understand that a show of all 'good news' doesn't have the same appeal as a disaster in the making. So it's not very likely that we'll ever see that kind of show either.


Jaybee
Oct 30, 2013, 11:42 PM
GardenSprite
Jaybee beat me to it but I would offer the same explanation. Libel and slander suits would be a possible if not likely result if contractors were named. He said/she said issues, scope, payment, and other related facts would be brought into question, but, and this is important, not adjudicated.

We don't know how savvy these homeowners really are, and how much they may have contributed to the situation. I'm not saying they're at fault, but one question I have repeatedly wondered is that when they recognized a problem, why didn't they intervene and either take more control of the work scope or take legal action? And why did they pay the contractor for shoddy work?

Assessing blame and liability is the venue of a court, not a tv show.

As to desirable shows, I'd prefer to see more actual instruction than dramatic smashing and bashing. The shows really aren't DIY shows as they don't spend enough time demonstrating instruction, process and techniques.

And I've never really understood the appeal of the smash-it-up style of programming.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
Nov 01, 2013, 11:55 AM
swschrad
watch out, Sprite, the Brotherhood of Sledgehammer Finishers will get ya! although frankly, I don't think that's what they had in mind when they advertised for "finish carpenters" for some of those shows.

I assume you watched WoodWorks when it was still on the air. all instruction, and no dynamite was harmed in the vacuum clamp molding of chair back laminations.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 01, 2013, 12:54 PM
GardenSprite
Uh, oh, looks like I've crossed the line again. I'll be on the lookout for big hulky guys with sledgehammers and run if I see them.

I've watched Norm's Yankee Workshop and Roy Underhill's Woodwright's programs, but don't think I've ever seen WoodWorks. But then some of those programs are too sophisticated for my meager skills.

There are a couple of programs I've watched with some very good instruction but I don't offhand recall which ones they were.

And as to harming anything, Underhill certainly doesn't even harm the electrical power grid when he creates something! Talk about non-impact creativity...
Nov 04, 2013, 12:42 PM
swschrad
myself, I don't think I've chased a PC problem far enough unless I also reboot the nuke plant Wink


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 04, 2013, 01:25 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by swschrad:
myself, I don't think I've chased a PC problem far enough unless I also reboot the nuke plant Wink


Just stay away from Fukushima.
Nov 07, 2013, 10:52 AM
swschrad
shouldn't we all? there's an example of a bad DIY project if ever you wanted one.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 07, 2013, 01:30 PM
swschrad
I will add one thing to Jaybee's post on releases. in the case of public venues, such as when The Mall of America (tm) was one site for the "mall cops" series, all entrances were posted with a notice... by entering, you authorize the producers to use your likeness for television without recourse.

that would hold up in court about as well as wearing a clown suit and calling the judge "puddinghead," but so far, it's worked. stare decisis, and all that (loosely translated out of the Latin, it's "yeah, but it's an insult to the past judges to change things now.")


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 07, 2013, 04:26 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by swschrad:
I will add one thing to Jaybee's post on releases. in the case of public venues, such as when The Mall of America (tm) was one site for the "mall cops" series, all entrances were posted with a notice... by entering, you authorize the producers to use your likeness for television without recourse.

that would hold up in court about as well as wearing a clown suit and calling the judge "puddinghead," but so far, it's worked. stare decisis, and all that (loosely translated out of the Latin, it's "yeah, but it's an insult to the past judges to change things now.")



I think the issue of posted notifications constituting releases may turn at least in part on the issue of "informed consent". I.e., are the people entering the mall informed (read "intelligent" or "educated" ) enough to know that they're granting what probably amounts to a license to use photos/film of them without any recourse or compensation? Would the average person know the implications of this kind of generalized release?

Not meaning to challenge you, but I understood stare decisis generally meant "let the decision stand", as in upholding or not challenging precedent law.

If blanket notifications have been upheld in previous decisions, another challenge, barring new or different issues, could under stare decisis remain the precedent. It's not necessarily an insult to past judges, but rather one of whether the key issues have changed.

There are also issues of judges not wanting their decisions to be overturned.

But I do understand what you're saying, rhetorically. And of course if the issue were decided at the Supreme court level, it could possibly be an issue of the prevailing p_o_l_i_t_i_c_a_l sentiment on the court at that time.

These kinds of releases are used in contests as well - submit your photos, artwork, magazine articles and you'll most likely be required to sign a release of your intellectual property rights. And if you register to participate in certain types of forums, you may very well find these clauses in the TOS. I won't mention any specific forums, but I'm definitely not referring to DIY.

But then I'm not an attorney.

Just something to think about...

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
Nov 09, 2013, 05:43 PM
swschrad
just about every website says they own everything you do on there, except Slashdot. that's all in the stuff you slide past and click "accept."


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?