DIY Network

All Projects

TV Projects

    What Do You Want To Work On?

      What Activity Do You Want To Do?

        0

        Available Projects

        Get Results

        DIY Network /

        Message Boards

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Outdoor Projects    concrete for basketball court in the backyard
        Go
        New
        Find
        Notify
        Tools
        Reply
          
        concrete for basketball court in the backyard Sign In/Join 
        posted
        Hello

        We live Austin, Texas and I am trying to get a quote for a half-size basketball court in our backyard. The quote I got was for $10-12k which seems very high to me. Can someone advise whats a good price to shoot for - to get this done. We are thinking maybe we go for getting the concrete done separately and then buy a hoop. How much should a 500 sq ft concrete cost in the backyard (it needs a bit of levelling as well)

        Thanks a bunch for your help

        Photobuddy
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jan 02, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        That does seem a little high. Your materials (6 to 7 yards concrete, gravel, forms) should run about $1,500. The rest is the labor needed to dig out and prep the site as well as pour and finish the concrete. Other possible costs are the variables of how accessible the project area is and how much site prep is needed to make it level. Also, this is for just a concrete slab, for a BB court, it would be much better if it has a coating on it. A BB goal will set you back about $500. So you are looking at $2,000 in material with the rest being labor. A guestimate average for a normal amount of prep work and slab finishing would be under $2,000 - So a total of $4,000 could be possible. Note that if 'leveling' requires installing a retaining wall that this alone could eat up all your money.

        There is a big difference between $4K and $10K. Easiest way to check how accurate the estimate is would be to get one or two more estimates and compare.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Jaybee,


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10425 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        how about Tartan surface instead? concrete is hard on the joints. Tartan is nice and gentle to run and jump on. in Texas, it should last just as long.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5820 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Conrad
        posted Hide Post
        Multiple estimates are what I would check also.
        If the area is inaccessible to a truck hose, and a contractor is having to wheel barrow all the concrete, labor costs are going to be high, and if he does not have enough labor, he will need to hire for the day.

        Regional prices vary on ready mix, and just how much fill or leveling is required prior can add significantly to the cost.
         
        Posts: 6894 | Location: Plains and Mountains | Registered: Sep 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks for all the replies. What is a Tartan surface ? I am also looking into installing pavers instead of poured concrete and the guy is quoting me about $8/sq-ft. This would give me a 500-sq-ft pavered field for about $4k. Then I need to get a goal and netting (to prevent the ball from going off into the road since the backyard faces a busy road)
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jan 02, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Tartan is a hot mix material that is rubberized. you lay it like blacktop. availiable in many colors, and used in top track surfaces and all-weather courts at many schools.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5820 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I think I've seen the Tartan material at the park across the street. If it is the same stuff it would be a little spongy for a basketball court.

        If there is limited access to the backyard and I were doing the concrete I'd get them to send a concrete pumping truck and pump it over the house rather than taking it back by wheelbarrow. You need a lot of people to off load a concrete truck quickly if you're wheeling it around the house by the wheelbarrow load. Most concrete companies charge you extra if it takes too long to off load the concrete.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 852 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Access is not a problem here. There is a gate in the backyard that opens up to the main road.
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jan 02, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by photobuddy:
        Access is not a problem here. There is a gate in the backyard that opens up to the main road.


        Are you planning to have the cement truck come through the gate? Keep in mind they weigh a bit more than your average truck or passenger car and will sink in where others tread more lightly without an issue.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 852 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I didnt think they dont need to "come in". the site for building the court is adjacent to the gate so if they back up the truck such that the backside opens up into the backyard, there is not much more hauling needed (unless the truck needs to drive around to dump the concrete that is). Thanks for your replies.
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jan 02, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of eric_hern
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by swschrad:
        Tartan is a hot mix material that is rubberized. you lay it like blacktop. availiable in many colors, and used in top track surfaces and all-weather courts at many schools.


        I think Tartan is ideal for family with kids. Is this material expensive?


        I'm a drywaller not a plumber. Leave it to me, most kitchen repair jobs should be left to the pros.
         
        Posts: 7 | Location: Bethesda, Maryland | Registered: Apr 02, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of lesliemorris85
        posted Hide Post
        That is a bit high indeed, but then the contractor may have seen some things that needed to be done first. Why not ask them an exact breakdown of the quote?
         
        Posts: 15 | Location: Dallas, Texas USA | Registered: Jan 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        A backyard basketball court is less expensive that of public basketball court. The quoted price is very much high than of those standards in public areas. If you will be the one to construct it with your family member, that would save you at least for manpower cost. Depending on the size, but for sure since that is in the backyard I assumed that it will not be as size of in public basketball court. All you need is steel, gravel and sands, then cement. and some materials and roughly I estimate that it will just cost you more or less $3k until the completion.


        "nfl picks & sports analyst"
         
        Posts: 2 | Location: USA | Registered: Jul 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I have several articles on this subject at basketballhoopsblog.com.

        It's tough to say what is high or not as prices differ depending upon your area of the country. Asphalt tends to be more affordable than concrete but I would recommend painting it if you go that route. (At least it is in the NY Metro area.)

        If you go with Brick Pavers I have some good ideas for you. Try removing the bricks where the lines will be and replace them with an off-colored brick. It makes for a sharp looking court.
         
        Posts: 1 | Location: United States | Registered: Feb 18, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by homecourthoops:
        I have several articles on this subject at basketballhoopsblog.com.

        It's tough to say what is high or not as prices differ depending upon your area of the country. Asphalt tends to be more affordable than concrete but I would recommend painting it if you go that route. (At least it is in the NY Metro area.)

        If you go with Brick Pavers I have some good ideas for you. Try removing the bricks where the lines will be and replace them with an off-colored brick. It makes for a sharp looking court.


        And we have another spammer, resurrecting a post over a year old to push his product. The OP has probably already built his court and you're about a year too late with your sales pitch.
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Indeed the price is too high. Perhaps it would be useful for you to check websites of other paving companies like this one. Some of them provide online calculation tools with which you can compare the prices in different firms. Buy the way the concrete, which is also highly used in paving works, is slightly cheaper than the asphalt.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Juana Haw,
         
        Posts: 13 | Registered: Apr 03, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Is there like some kind of spammer code of honor or something. You know: "I promise to find the oldest post I can to make my inane comments to establish myself on the message board so I can hawk my links"

        Just wondering. I mean I know that it's mostly the same spammer under different screen names but you'd think they'd figure things out after a while.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10425 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Jaybee:

        I mean I know that it's mostly the same spammer under different screen names but you'd think they'd figure things out after a while.


        Perhaps the fact that they haven't is why they still think spamming is an effective use of time. After all, how many people have time to waste going through posts as far back as 2012? Especially if you have to do real work for a living.

        Or maybe it just gets lonely and this is their social life down in those dark, musty, dank basements where these characters spend their time.
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
          Powered by Social Strata  
         

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Outdoor Projects    concrete for basketball court in the backyard

        © Scripps Networks 2009

        Advertisement

        Posting Guidelines

        • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
        • No off-topic or off-color postings.
        • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of DIY moderators.
        • No advertising is allowed.
        • Be nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
        • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political or religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by DIY.

        Full Guidelines

        For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.