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        posted
        I'm wanting to put a bar on my back patio. I have a piece of solid walnut that I have finished and want to use as my bar. My house is brick. Any suggestions on how to attach it to the house to make it appear suspended or floating? The bar is 3x20x5' so it's rather heavy.
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Apr 28, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        That is a pretty good chunk of wood to be trying to make it non supported. I would imagine that the brick is just a veener over framing as most are now days. If it was a block w/brick faced it would be much easier. Problem is that religiously bars will be leaned upon. I seriously doubt that you will be able to hang it floating style strong enough to withstand that. Just for the fact that you have nothing with substantial thickness to anchor it to. You might consiuder a couple decorative metal corbels anchored into the brick.

        If and that is a big word (because of the brick) that you could locate the studs you could lag screw long lags into the studs, Cut off the hex head once they are secure. Drill corresponding deep holes into the back edge of your shelf and then slide it onto the protruding lag shafts. Using epoxy to secure it in place. It would have to be a large enough diameter that would withstand bending.

        Another approach would be a "french cleat". But this would have to be made from metal by a fabrication shop. One half (bottom) attached to the wall and a corresponding half attached to the back edge of the shelf.
         
        Posts: 1781 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        I was going to post suggestions but redoverfarm has said exactly what I would mention. The only option I can add is to consider making a steel frame for the bar that is self supporting yet can be pushed up against the house. This would be a steel frame shaped like a 'C' to both support the 20" overhang and make it appear that there is clear space underneath.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10452 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Yes, the brick is over framing. And I have thought about finding the studs and using the lag approach you suggested. But my thoughts were to use a 3/4 inch threaded rod into the studs and have 15" sticking out to slide the bar on. My concerns are that the threaded rod may not support the weight of the wood.
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Apr 28, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Here is a company that makes 3/4" Lag up to 24" in length. IMO if you have 10" protruding into the wood at three equally situated locations it should be sufficent. If you go too long then there is more of a chance for them to bend. So if you choose this route then you will have to determine what length you will need to penetrate the brick and into the studs ( size 2X4 or 2X6 ?) and still have something into the shelf.

        http://www.wholesalebolts.com/...eadlagscrews3/4.aspx
         
        Posts: 1781 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        guys will sit on countertops (wife didn't believe it, but as soon as I glued and reinforces with angle aluminum, here comes 250-pound Son #3 to see our progress, scoots up and sits on it) and lean on bars.

        guaranteed.

        I don't think lags into the 1-1/2 inch side of your 2x4s are going to hold this. more likely split the studs with two sets of elbows, and down she comes. you are going to have to use 2 or 3 inch square stock to make that C-frame, welded joints, and prime and two coats of RustOleum brushed over it.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5832 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Yup, that 20" of potential leverage will be your undoing.

        Even 3/4" threaded rod will not support that kind of leverage without bending. If you were building from scratch the house framing could be reinforced by adding multiple stacked studs to take the load. Even then the best bracket would be a custom welded plate to spread the load vertically along the reinforced studs with a 1-1/4" (approx) pipe welded to the bracket. But this can only be done with the brick gone - not going to happen I suspect.

        swschrad is correct, a bar will get leaned on.

        I suspect that the best combination of function, cost and looks will be a pair of legs on the corners of the bar.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10452 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Thanks for the input. For price and function I am going to put some braces (45's) from the leftover walnut I have. Legs are not an option.
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Apr 28, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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