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        How to get rid of roof moss without damaging it? Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I have bad problem with my roof over the winter. There are mosses everywhere.

        I tried to spray with 10% clorox mixed water and pushed with the broom but I still cannot get rid of those sticking at the edges. Also if you see the 3rd photo, there is a thin layer of those (maybe something else not moss) which are extremely sticky.

        I don't want to pressure wash it. Is there a way to get rid of them? I saw some solution in Home Depot where you spray some chemical and leave it there on a sunny day. It may kill the mosses but can it completely CLEAN them off?

         
        Posts: 284 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I am a retired home inspector and I have seen strange things that looked like moss but were not. Before deciding what to do you need to know EXACTLY what you are dealing with. I suggest you send a sample of the substance to a laboratory for testing. Once you know what it is, then you can decide how to properly get rid of it. Keep this in mind, though. You may have to let a professional take care of it, depending on what the substance really is.
        This may not be the advice you wanted, but I do not believe in sugar coating anything when it comes to the home.
         
        Posts: 20 | Location: Clarksville, TN | Registered: Dec 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Hello, Quanghoc and welcome back.

        I notice in the first photo that something appears to be growing in the gutter underneath the cover. And it looks like there's a mossy tree just beyond the ladder. Is moss a problem on your trees as well?

        The growth in the third photo does look like moss and the growth in the first two photos look as if there's something else (like the froth maples produce before the flyers develop) mixed in with the moss. I'm wondering if the wind is blowing something into the crevices between the shingles and creating a favorable environment for the moss to grow.

        My point is that I'm wondering if there are trees nearby that might be creating a favorable environment for the mosses to start? Are the mossy areas on the roof on the north side of it?

        If there's a ventilation issue because of surrounding trees and insufficient air flow, that might explain the repeated growth.

        As I recall you're either in Seattle or Oregon, which I believe had an extraordinarily wet winter (as did many of us!). I assume you didn't have a moss problem before this year?

        Did some quick Googling and found a TOH video with Tom Silva showing how to remove moss, but it's a very tedious process that would require a lot of work. (http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,1630921,00.html).

        However, it did show him spraying with a mixture of equal parts water and bleach. Perhaps you could try just a few areas with a mix that has more than 10% bleach and see how that works?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1966 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        once it's off, slip some copper flashing or zinc flashing under the top edge of shingles, and stick it down with roofing cement. should really be nailed down, but that's new construction. at least an inch should protrude.

        as it oxidizes and rain falls, this releases the metal oxide to run down the roof and kills further growth. you've seen older roofs with clean spots beneath the galvanized flashing? same deal, only designed to cover the whole roof.

        many new shingle products claim to have this property in some of the granules. but that wears out quickly. a sacrificial metal strip will do the whole job for a couple decades, the usual life of a roof.

        I can't believe you'll ever get all that stuff off, and trying too hard is going to damage the roof. moss, like mold, sends tendrils into the material it's on, anchoring it.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5858 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Yes I live in PNW and moss is big problem here. My roof looks OK last year and I guess there was some too. But this year, it's way out of hand.

        Trees around also have the same problem. I got trees in 3 corners of the house so yeah! :P

        I attached another closer photo of the "moss" (?!) near the edge. Maybe you can tell what it is by the look? 10% bleed did nothing to them.

        I saw my neighbor hired some guy to clean the roof and he pressured wash it. IS IT RIGHT?? Maybe he turned down the pressure but I was told even the push broom may damage the granulates too... I had to be super gentle / careful...

         
        Posts: 284 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Several solutions mentioned at this site.

        http://www.ask.com/web?am=broa...=10469&l=sem&af=&_=1
         
        Posts: 1786 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        I see at least 3 different kinds of moss, but I'm wondering about the moss with white flowers - haven't seen that before. I don't know what kinds of moss they are but if I can figure it out, I'll let you know.
         
        Posts: 1966 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        http://www.insurance-simplifie...nsurable%20house.jpg

        Also, you may want to take care of those nail pops, exposed nails, etc..
        Is it just this portion of the roof, maybe you could just start with a new roof on this section. If the metal works it would be really nice to know.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 910 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        Regarding the effectiveness of the copper or zinc flashing. When we had our roof replaced around 8 years ago, I had them install zinc strips near the ridge of a problem area (back of garage that is shaded by a large maple).
        The shingles were a good quality architectural type (Certainteed). I'm not sure if it was due to properties of the shingles or the effects of the zinc flashing, but something kept the moss at bay for the first few years.
        But, in the past couple of years, the moss has come back in full force. The tree is actually trimmed further away from the roof than it was when the new roof was installed, so, if anything, the roof is getting more ventilation.
        Something has become less effective though. I even tried wire brushing the exposed portion of the zinc strips in hopes of rejuvenating them, but that didn't help.

        Just how expensive is a stone coated metal roof???

        Good luck.
         
        Posts: 350 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        looks to me in the latest sale flyer that metal roof panels (painted) are about 2-3 times more expensive than mid-grade shingles. the install tech is different, no idea how to guess what that does to the labor cost. getting the panels up would be more work. this is the material meant for Mansard roofs.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5858 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        redoverfarm posted a link above, and when viewing it I came across this video. I searched the site to see what formula he used, here's what I found.
        1 gallon shock
        2 gallon water
        4 oz. dish liquid
        If this doesn't help your situation, I don't know what will.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d9hM4Cj640

        ....
         
        Posts: 910 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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