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            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Outdoor Projects    water in my basement every time it rains.
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        water in my basement every time it rains. Sign In/Join 
        posted
        My house is on a slope, so the basement at the front of the house is underground. Every time it rains we have to pull out the wet/dry vac. How can this problem be rectified with little to no money. Am open to any and all idears. Frown
         
        Posts: 4 | Registered: May 05, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        So, I assume the back of the house is above grade based on your description.

        First you want to make sure the leader pipes for your gutters direct water away from the foundation. If you just have the splash blocks where they dump onto the ground get some downspout to match your existing downspouts and extend them out several feet. If you don't have gutters, get them. Long term I'd pipe the water away from the house. Next make sure the land around your house slopes away from the house for at least 10 feet and then make sure you have swales to direct the surface water away from your house. If there are any low spots where water puddles fill them in and make sure the water runs towards the low point on your property away from the house.

        If these fixes don't work you're into more expensive things like a sump pump, exterior water proofing and new footer drains around the perimeter of your foundation. If you have footer drains already make sure the end isn't blocked and the water runs out freely.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 604 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Sparky pretty well nailed it: The only low cost options are making sure that the water on the roof hits the gutters, runs into the downspouts and is then directed away from the house. About the only other inexpensive fix would be to dig a swale across the uphill part of the yard in front of the house to direct surface water to the sides and away from the basement.

        Beyond that you are entering the world or lots of work and lots of money.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10092 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I caught an episode of Bob Vila's show yesterday and in his project house they were using a new interior damp proofing system on an old rubble stone foundation that directed the condensated water down to a perimeter floor drain system. The project will in the end finish the basement of the turn of the 20th Century home in Mass.

        It is available on-line here: http://www.bobvila.com/section...ghborhood-in-melrose The system is installed in the last half of the first episode. Interesting solution for a house that would likely be impossible to waterproof from the outside without replacing the rubble-stone foundation.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 604 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        thx, i'll check it out. i appriciate ur advice.
         
        Posts: 4 | Registered: May 05, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Hi azlyxa,

        The advice you have received to this point is quite good. However, another way you might be able to solve your problem is by installing a French Drain in your front yard roughly 12' and then 3'or 4' from your home foundation. These drains will catch the flow of water runoff which is coming down from higher levels and carry it away around your home before the water reaches your home foundation, thus lowering the total amount of water that may run up against your foundation where it drains down to the footings and builds up quickly and enters your home.

        Below are several links which explain steps to take to lay a French Drain properly, as well as the planning needed and the tools, supplies, and equipment needed.

        http://www.hgtv.com/landscapin...nch-drain/index.html

        http://www.landscapedrainagesolutions.com/id97.html

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6r4ZSbTQ8U

        In the last link the video shows the use of catch basins. From what you have stated it doesn't appear as though you need these, though using the 6" diameter pipe would allow for a large volume of water to be caught and drained away before it reaches your home foundation.

        Using this method, you might also tie in your downspouts to the French Drain so that water is carried away from the front of your home and deposited at a lower level. Be sure that wherever the water discharges that it doesn't interfere with a neighbour's property otherwise a new issue will need to be dealt with.

        Some thoughts for you to consider.

        Good Luck!
         
        Posts: 511 | Registered: Mar 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        if those internior perimiter drains are plastic, they're old hat, installed in this area from at least the late 70s. installed as in "arm and a leg and your first-born son" expensive.

        one problem... the water is in the house already. you have already lost the battle, you are just turning up the TV so you don't hear the clash of swords between the mold and the basement's deterioration.

        the win is keeping the water OUT. the goal of all house construction and repair is directing water OUT, and then downhill, and away from the house.

        had a biology professor who built an early-plan earth-sheltered home, and it was a nasty wet mess. by the time they finally got it conquered by digging out, properly waterproofing and physically protecting the waterproofing, as well as drains and pumps, everybody was chronically ill from mold. he died early.

        get a soil core at the front if nothing else, and see what you're working with. if you hit clay before you get past the footings, you are going to have to go with wraparound perimiter drains and discharge into the street or into a far-front French drain. the only worst case would be if you hit an underground stream.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5475 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Simplyme, I have considered a French drain, but I hear it can be so costly. Someone told me I should seal the basement walls first to see if that helps.
         
        Posts: 4 | Registered: May 05, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Swschard, my house was built in 1998. Its also below street level so all the water comes down to the house from the street when it rains. Someone also suggested replacing the dirt around the house that has washed away over the years. I think the best thing would be the french drain. I definitely don't want to put a bandaid on it, I want the problem to go away. Thx for the advice!
         
        Posts: 4 | Registered: May 05, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Aziyza,
        Given the relative young age of your house I suspect the following are true:

        1. The exterior foundation was waterproofed when it was built.
        2. There are footer drains around the underground portions of your house.

        I would check for low spot near the house where water puddles and fill those in, making sure the water flows AWAY from the house. Further, I would ensure that the leader pipes for your gutters are clear and carry the water away from your house at least 10'. Third, I'd make sure your footer drains run to daylight and are not blocked in anyway. My house is midway down a hill as well with the basement fully underground at the front and fully above ground at the back. I had issues when I first moved in with water being trapped under my slab because the clay soil was holding the water under the slab at the back of the house. They had only put footer drains around the underground sides of the house. We added drains around the back of the house and it has been dry ever since. I had a wet spot in my yard between my house and my neighbors house. His footer drain ended underground. We dug down found the end of the footer drain and extended it further down the hill and ran it to daylight so it could drain. The landscaper buried it when he graded the yard and didn't uncover it.

        Last option would be a sump pump to lower the water table, but if the back of the house is above grade you should be able to drain the water under your house without a pump. Gravity will do the job for you.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Sparky617,


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 604 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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