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        Low yard with standing water - regrade? Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I recently purchased my home on an 1 acre parcel. The yard is very low with a mound in the center where they built the house. The also built up the driveway.

        I am having a lot of standing water in my property after a rain. These photos were taken 2 days (90 degree FL sun) after a rain and I still have this much standing water.

        I think the problem is that my entire back yard is about level with the drainage ditch of my neighbor. His yard is much higher than mine and basically drains right into my yard. I don't blame him for it I just think the contractor that built my home did not grade the property correctly the first time.

        In an ideal world I would like to raise the elevation of my entire property by a foot. Is that even remotely possible? What would be a good approach to contain the water in an appropriate drainage ditch between the property lines? I really appreciate any suggestions on what could be done with this property!

        Pictures of my yard
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Sep 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        You really only have two choices:

        1. Bring in lots of fill dirt and raise your property above that of the lots next to you. This will be very expensive and basically means creating an entire new yard.

        2. If you can find someplace lower than your property that you can drain to, then you can install an underground drainage system to carry the water away. Or, you can create swales to direct water towards these lower areas. If you don't have a lower elevation to shoot for, then you are out of luck with this.

        Water is pretty stupid and will look for the low spots. If those low spots are in your yard all you can do is either fill or drain.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10289 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        Looking at your first photo ("ditch along street"), I wondered if that area is maintained by your public works department. Is is possible to get them to do something to help you a little--like make the ditch deeper and slope it away from your property?
         
        Posts: 286 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Bring in lots of fill dirt and raise your property above that of the lots next to you. This will be very expensive and basically means creating an entire new yard.

        How expensive? 1,000? 10,000? I have no idea what something like this would cost but this is what I want. I don't know if I am being unreasonable.

        quote:
        If you can find someplace lower than your property that you can drain to, then you can install an underground drainage system to carry the water away. Or, you can create swales to direct water towards these lower areas. If you don't have a lower elevation to shoot for, then you are out of luck with this.

        What about installing a dry well under one of the wet areas and installing drain hose from around the yard into the dry well?

        Sturdynail, thanks for the suggestion but I doubt the county is going to help me. The project I live in was a failed planned subdivision where the builder went bankrupt and various other builders picked up individual home sites years later. The street and ditch along it were built by the original, now bankrupt builder. I live in unincorporated Orange county, it's quite rural and I think I'm basically on my own.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: FL_Guy,
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Sep 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        you're still going to need a permit from your county to fill and regrade the yard.
        In some florida counties it is illegal to change the grading that will alter the flow of water. You better check with your counties board before you do / make any changes. I don't care if you are in a rural area, you still need permission "in writing " to change the grade
        Notice, I also live in florida
         
        Posts: 2535 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        FL Guy, the builder could have built the ditches as part of the subdivision development plans. Sometimes builders do assume the responsibility of some of the infrastructure development, such as access roads and traffic signals.

        The issue would be whether there's an drainage easement over the ditch area in favor of the local city or township, even if it is very rural.

        Check the title work and the survey you should have gotten when you purchased the property.
         
        Posts: 1896 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        There is really no way to estimate the cost of filling the yard (at least, not from the internet) - you'll have to get a local excavator to take a look to get an accurate quote. However, it will be much closer to $10K vs $1K. Depending on how much dirt is needed and how far it has to come from, the cost could go even higher.

        And, as pointed out, you'll need a grading permit - if you can get one.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10289 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Here's a way of reducing cost. Builders have to grade a lot or area before building. Sometimes they will place signs that say "FREE DIRT. YOU HAUL." to get rid of the excess dirt. If you have access to a pick-up truck then you can get all you need.
         
        Posts: 10 | Location: Clarksville, TN | Registered: Dec 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        From the pictures it looks like the one is just a low spot and could be filled in. The other spot appears to be in the ditch line.
        It appears there is a swale between the two properties that leads either to the ditch or back yard.
        Maybe you could fill in the low spots and regrade what you have.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 827 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        doctorwho,
        There is little need in digging up a post from 8 months ago to add fresh comments. The OP made 2 posts and none since Sep 4, 2013. He's moved on and likely won't come back to read your advice.

        Dredging up old posts is typically the work of spammers around here. Generally speaking a post more than a few weeks old is not worth adding comments to.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 710 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Unless the OP has email notifications on. Then he will see the new advise and appreciate it.
        Cool
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Sep 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        FL guy lives.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 710 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        if you move your own dirt, and keep your own water, you ought to be able to permit it. dig a pond. berm the house and driveway. sounds like you're on your own in Dodge as long as the authorities can see you're not impacting any neighbors or drowning anything with easements. flip mosquito pellets in there periodically, and keep an eye out for alligators.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5710 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I agree. I didn't notice the original posting date when I replied.
         
        Posts: 10 | Location: Clarksville, TN | Registered: Dec 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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