DIY Network

All Projects

TV Projects

    What Do You Want To Work On?

      What Activity Do You Want To Do?

        0

        Available Projects

        Get Results

        DIY Network /

        Message Boards

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Outdoor Projects    DIY treehouse for a beginner
        Page 1 2 
        Go
        New
        Find
        Notify
        Tools
        Reply
          
        DIY treehouse for a beginner Sign In/Join 
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        And our tea room during assembly from the outside of the trees looking inward.

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Our wizard's Den is a bit clearer here with more of the Castle's "Rapunzel's tower" visable

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Here is more of a "frontal view" of the Margrose Castle. The face of the deck is 16 feet wide!

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Below our Castle is our Fairy Garden!

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        The trees like to watch over our children and Fairies at play!

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Some Children viewing the fairies at the "hospital"...

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Children looking for fairies near the hobbit hole...

         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        It is almost 2:30am right now, so I will post a tour of the Fairy village tomorrow (if you like).
         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Thank you so much for your kind efforts to share your marvelous and imaginative creations! I am truly in awe of the imagination, dedication and hospitality that you and your family are creating.

        I haven't yet had time to go through all the posts but just wanted to let you know how appreciative I am of your efforts.

        This is not a criticism, but rather a query: given the range of your creativity, have you ever considered a topiary garden, especially for the dinosaur section? With your engineering background, I'm sure you could easily design quite a range of prehistoric creatures.

        Again, thank you for taking the time to share this.

        And, BTW, website prohibition is for spammers who are trying to suck in innocent people and get a few cents per click. You obviously aren't in that category. I read your profile and was impressed by how much you're giving back to the community.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1752 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks GardenSprite,
        I truly appreciate the kind words.

        I was looking at some forms of a topiary garden, but I am still somewhat plant and landscape ignorant. I thought I would start out on an easier / lower maintenance construction, where I have a mound of soil in the shape of a giant lizard type creature and plant "hens and chickens" on the mound to make it look like scales. As time continues and I learn more on how to grow, care, and maintain plants and topiary gardens, I hope to expand.

        This is all still very new to me, it has only been (roughly) 19 months since I have started construction of my first tree house and I never thought that it would balloon this large this quickly. I am in a unique and fortunate situation where I get to spend time with my children while they are young.

        If people are interested, I have a website www.treecreations.org and I am on Facebook under "Tree Creations in Geneseo" (or the link: https://www.facebook.com/pages...eseo/507249102622153)

        I'm off to go get more work done, but If you would like, I can post more soon!

        Thanks again and all the best,

        ~Joe Ferrero
        Geneseo, NY
         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        If you're still interested in restoration of the car, contact http://www.countskustoms.com/
        They might be interested in featuring it on their T.V. show, considering its rarity, and you might even get it done for nothing
         
        Posts: 2504 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        JJ, thanks so much for the time spent in adding these photos, and for answering my questions. And I do have a few more!
        How did you get the Triumph up on the platform?

        What's the name of the warplane museum, and where is it located? I think a warbird would be a wonderful addition to your tree village, and would most likely expand the visiting population quite a bit.

        The restoration of the Triumph is amazing; that's quite a project, and also quite a tribute to your intent to save it rather than just junk it, as many people would.

        I've been gardening since I was a child; if you ever have any gardening questions, feel free to ask. If I ever make it to visit your village, I could bring some plants from my garden.

        It seems the accident was a life changing event for you, and an example of how something very unfortunate can inspire or be the instigation for a lifestyle change that benefits not only you but your family, neighborhood and the community at large.

        I understand your point about the high maintenance of a topiary garden. Hens and chickens would be perfect because they spread easily, don't need trimming, and come in a variety of designs and colors.

        There are some topiary sculptures in this link to the Montreal topiaries that show the use of sedums (of which hens & chicks are a variety) that might be of inspiration in creating your dinosaur area.

        http://www.slideshare.net/mariane2/mosaiculturegarden

        I think the geese in the second photo have wings of hens and chickens. The fish and swans may as well, but it's really had to tell from the photos. I had some trouble with this site; sometimes the photos advanced, sometimes they didn't. I had to just keep trying.

        There's also an animal topiary garden at Green Mansions, but I think these topiaries are of privet or some type of clippable hedge and are very high maintenance. Still, they offer an idea of what might be done by using dinosaurs that aren't elevated and are leafed out with sedums.

        I could offer so many more comments on everything, but just let me say that your creations are creative and inspiring!
         
        Posts: 1752 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of JJFerrero
        posted Hide Post
        To make sure I cover all the points, I will try to address the again in parts...

        quote:
        Originally posted by GardenSprite:
        JJ, thanks so much for the time spent in adding these photos, and for answering my questions. And I do have a few more!
        How did you get the Triumph up on the platform?


        Well, As a mechanical engineer, I built a "rig" designed to hold the car, used a half dozen "come-a-long" ratcheting cables, and then suspended the vehicle over the poles. Once above the poles, we lowered the chassis of the automobile onto the poles and secured the vehicle with metal strapping.


        quote:
        What's the name of the warplane museum, and where is it located? I think a warbird would be a wonderful addition to your tree village, and would most likely expand the visiting population quite a bit.


        National Warplane Museum - Geneseo
        Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages...1?hc_location=stream


        quote:
        The restoration of the Triumph is amazing; that's quite a project, and also quite a tribute to your intent to save it rather than just junk it, as many people would.


        Thank you! I like doing things that are different and enjoy a challenge. There is an expression that says "If it were easy, everyone would do it!" but I don't think everyone would put a car in their trees - even if it were easy.


        quote:
        I've been gardening since I was a child; if you ever have any gardening questions, feel free to ask. If I ever make it to visit your village, I could bring some plants from my garden.


        I would really love it! It would be nice if my gardening skills were good enough, that maybe (one day) the gardens here could be an attraction. Right now, we are trying to figure out what we need to do with the perennials for winter - do we need to cut them back now/in the spring? We have both flowering plants like Japanese Anemone and ferns like Beaded Lady Fern. Will be doing some internet research soon and would appreciate any advice on what sites are a go-to for comprehensive advice that would not scare beginners.


        quote:
        It seems the accident was a life changing event for you, and an example of how something very unfortunate can inspire or be the instigation for a lifestyle change that benefits not only you but your family, neighborhood and the community at large.


        I just recently saw a quote that states how life has changed for me: "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." - Winston Churchill

        So far, everything I have done is all out of pocket (materials, help, equipment, insurance, time, etc), and I am trying to keep it free of charge to anyone that would like to visit (I know not the best business model). I don't want people to feel obligated for donations, and not totally sure how to approach the situation.

        How to sustain and build onto the tree houses (I feel) will be a long hard learning process for me. IF I can figure the financial part out without charging money and getting enough to maintain, and build on - I'll be all set!

        quote:

        I understand your point about the high maintenance of a topiary garden. Hens and chickens would be perfect because they spread easily, don't need trimming, and come in a variety of designs and colors.


        There are some topiary sculptures in this link to the Montreal topiaries that show the use of sedums (of which hens & chicks are a variety) that might be of inspiration in creating your dinosaur area.

        http://www.slideshare.net/mariane2/mosaiculturegarden

        I think the geese in the second photo have wings of hens and chickens. The fish and swans may as well, but it's really had to tell from the photos. I had some trouble with this site; sometimes the photos advanced, sometimes they didn't. I had to just keep trying.

        There's also an animal topiary garden at Green Mansions, but I think these topiaries are of privet or some type of clippable hedge and are very high maintenance. Still, they offer an idea of what might be done by using dinosaurs that aren't elevated and are leafed out with sedums.[/QUOTE]

        Very Cool and some GREAT ideas! I honestly didn't know that plants could be made to look like animals, people, the Eiffel tower, etc! I am curious to see what is required for maintenance and how it is done, and I wonder If I can figure out a way or design something to lessen the maintenance aspect so more people can have gardens like the ones seen on the link you sent. Again, they are awesome!

        quote:
        I could offer so many more comments on everything, but just let me say that your creations are creative and inspiring!


        Again, thank you for the kind words. I took a look earlier on my website, and I noticed that my website www.TreeCreations.org had some photos that were not loading, I took care of the problem and we should not have that issue again. Sorry for the inconvenience and now you can see some of the photos that were not previously up.

        Best,

        ~Joe
         
        Posts: 21 | Location: Geneseo, NY | Registered: Oct 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Joe, just a comment on pruning... Plants don't necessarily have to be cut back on an annual basis. I only cut back perennials such as irises and daylilies in the summer after they've bloomed and if I'm transplanting them. If you have very aggressive perennials that need to be cut back annually, such as some wildflowers or herbs, you might consider planting them in containers to control their growth.

        Bulb foliage and ferns also don't need to be cut back. Your ferns will just die back to the crowns, then releaf next spring.

        Some folks don't like the look of dying tulip and daffodil foliage, but that foliage is a key to restoring strength and nutrients to the bulbs for next year's bloom.

        Shrubbery are a different matter, but at any rate, given that you're in NY and either in a frost period or close to one, I wouldn't cut anything back now. You're more likely to lose the plant. Sometimes I do trim evergreens for holiday swags or wreaths, but otherwise everything gets to rest until next year, unless I deliberately want to kill the plant (or tree). I'm in the process now of stripping bark from junk trees I want to kill.

        Grapevines could have been trimmed earlier in the month and used for wreaths and plant people (to create sculptures in your garden - more on that in a later post) but it's a bit late and the vines tend to get harder and less flexible as frost time grows closer.

        My first choice for info on plants is Fine Gardening's website and magazines. Better Homes and Gardens used to have a decent gardening forum but it's been gone for years. Its magazines are nice, including the special on cottage gardens, but they're not as scientific or as detailed as FG. Same with its online sites. FG can be a touch more upscale, but it's also for serious gardeners, with articles that aren't beyond a newbie's grasp.

        An example: Living Walls:

        http://www.finegardening.com/p...ne-gardening-eletter.

        I had thought of small mazes and labyrinths for the fantasy areas of your complex, as well as vertical pumpkin and gourd walls for a children's picking garden (and possible pumpking carving classes as a fundraiser). Vertical floral or multicolored walls are also a possibility for a small maze, or as a backdrop for the fantasy areas of your complex.

        http://www.finegardening.com/i...ne-gardening-eletter

        http://www.finegardening.com/item/9818/living-walls

        http://gardenjunkiesblog.com/2...its-of-living-walls/

        http://www.squarestate.net/awe...in-an-urban-setting/

        FG also publishes specials annually on Design, Container Gardening and Great Plants. I usually pick them up at Lowes or grocery stores.

        More later; I've thought of a lot of things to highlight your fantasy areas, some of which hold some fundraising potential, incluing designer stepping stones, larger fairy people and mushroom houses, etc. But I need to get all the references together first.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1752 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
          Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2  
         

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Outdoor Projects    DIY treehouse for a beginner

        © Scripps Networks 2009

        Advertisement

        Posting Guidelines

        • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
        • No off-topic or off-color postings.
        • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of DIY moderators.
        • No advertising is allowed.
        • Be nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
        • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political or religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by DIY.

        Full Guidelines

        For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.