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        storage loft above garage door in high ceiling garage Sign In/Join 
        posted
        In my quest to finish basement (which is stalled at the moment due to getting quotes, estimates, and documenting problems in case of legal battle) I have another project waiting to be tackled. I have room to put a decent sized storage spot above the garage door (about 20'w X 5' deep X 4 1/2' high, the garage is 14' plus high inside) It would be great for stuff in my way in basement.And unless I get taller door and starting parking the Pope mobile in there the space is wasted
        I have searched the interweb a little and have seen the racks you can buy and hang from the ceiling but the way my lucks been running I'd probably find joists up there to be way to insufficient. (they are supposed to be same I joists I see in basement).
        So I got an idea to build loft and support it on sides and down to floor (sides have 2 X 6 framing). Anyone out there seen or done something like this?
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
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        We've made a lot of these and usually support them from the ceiling framing above. One main point is that even though you have 5' of depth available, it's probably better to make the shelving only about half that. Two reasons for this:

        1. At 5' deep, you can't reach back in there very well - remember you'll be working off a ladder.
        2. If you are only about 30" out from the wall, you will be tying into the framing above where it is close enough to the wall so that much of the additional load is supported by the load bearing wall.

        We usually make the shelves out or a 2x4 frame with a 1/2" OSB decking. On the front edge, about every 8', we'll run a 2x4 that is anchored into the front of the edge framing on the shelf and attached to a Simpson 'U' shaped bracket above. Screw the bracket into the ceiling framing through the drywall and then into the 2x4 brace.

        You can put a fair amount of weight up there although it's best for tub or box storage. Once again, because you need a ladder to get there.

        The down-side to your idea of supporting it to the floor is that you are adding columns that interfere with your garage space. You could also go with a much stronger and larger header or truss to span the distance but at a minimum of 20' it would have to be a very large truss. Also, you'll start getting into more expense.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10500 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        sounds pretty good, my thoughts on coming down with supports were having them landing on block that extends out slightly and possibly sister next to vertical 2 X 6's... I'll post pic of garage in present state tomorrow.
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
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        Since you have so much height - you could also make diagonal braces from the outer edge of the shelving running upwards at an angle to tie into the wall.

        It's important to factor in how you are going to get up there. Could be as simple as buying a large step ladder that you keep in the garage. We built one where we converted a section of an extension ladder to hook onto a metal bar fitted to the front of the shelf.

        On a slightly different tact - there are a lot of garage storage lifts available. Google garage storage lift to see.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10500 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Take a look at some of these solutions.. Also remember sometimes it depends on how the trusses are running. What size are your trusses and how are they running in relation to the garage door.?

        http://www.familyhandyman.com/garage/storage

        ...

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 921 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        quote:
        Originally posted by Jaybee:
        It's important to factor in how you are going to get up there. Could be as simple as buying a large step ladder that you keep in the garage. We built one where we converted a section of an extension ladder to hook onto a metal bar fitted to the front of the shelf.

        On a slightly different tact - there are a lot of garage storage lifts available. Google garage storage lift to see.


        thought one the drop down attic type unit could work. I haven't looked yet to see if they make one with long enough folding ladder but with the giant homes and high ceilings these day's you would think it exists.
        I attached photo (I hope) of the spot to put in loft/ledge/shelf and as you can see it could be made deeper the the 4-5 estimate if I wanted to

         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        quote:
        Originally posted by ron45:
        Take a look at some of these solutions.. Also remember sometimes it depends on how the trusses are running. What size are your trusses and how are they running in relation to the garage door.?...


        Ceiling has drywall and as best as can tell without climbing ladder and poking around with stud finder or cutting through they probably run parallel with door or front (perpendicular to tracks).
        Also during my crash course in EL (engineered lumber) construction,plus examining the ones in the basement, I don't think the flanges on them would be good for holding much weight (if I tried to hang structure from ceiling).
        Just been doing a little light reading about wood I joists in John Spiers book "Building with Engineered Lumber" and trying to learn its proper applications to solve basement troubles.

        Well its back to "Labor camp"

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: measure2,
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        It's not hard to build a loft there, I just thought maybe your thinking it was your only option.?

        Remember the loft would be supported on three sides leaving only the front. The front can be done several ways either using the trusses above or the front wall by using cantilevers. The cantilevers can either be board and bolt or cables.
         
        Posts: 921 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
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        I will say again a word of caution about making the shelving deeper - even if you have room for it. While it's easy enough to make shelves strong enough to hold stuff, adding in a crawling person means much heavier construction to be safe. That, plus it's difficult to transition from a ladder to crawling on a shelf while moving boxes or bins.

        Plus, the further out from the perimeter you go the greater the load on the ceiling framing or wherever you are braced from.

        With as high a garage as you have, you can do shelving all around the perimeter on all 4 walls if you want. That makes for an enormous amount of storage area, even if it's only 24" to 30" deep.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10500 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Sorry if I'm missing something here, but I thought he was talking about a loft not shelves. A loft would be like a deck attached to walls. Three of the rim joist would be bolted to the walls, and have floor joist and hangers.
        Again I am sorry I miss understood.
         
        Posts: 921 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
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        I think you could call it either. From his OP he has a space that's 20' wide x 5' deep x 4-1/2' high that he wants to use for storage. If it winds up that full depth then I'd tend to call it more of a storage loft. Shallower would be a shelf.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10500 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        quote:
        I think you could call it either. From his OP he has a space that's 20' wide x 5' deep x 4-1/2' high that he wants to use for storage. If it winds up that full depth then I'd tend to call it more of a storage loft. Shallower would be a shelf.


        Jaybee


        Sorry I haven't had chance to respond, weather channel has us at defcon 3 with this weather, I've been busy helping neighbors dig out since I'm now one the few here that has a snowthrower,its already paying off since I scored a twelve pack of Heavy Sea's for freeing one neighbor's truck from Snowplow pile.
        But anyway, I guess loft would be right and good call not to go too wide. I don't see any good way to attach to I-joists above for any additional support since these joists (EL allow only minimal nailing/screwing). Need to figure out load (not putting any pianos up there) for this span and then choose appropriate joist/beam size.
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Posts: 921 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
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        Measure-

        It did not sink in until now that you said "I-Joist" in your original post.

        You are right to be concerned since you have I-Joists instead of trusses or conventional lumber. I-Joists are not designed to hang a load on the bottom cord. There are still many ways to attach to the underside of the I-Joist, provided you have access above to the I-Joists. You can add solid lumber or metal strapping to tie the top cord of the joist to the bottom in the area where you need to hang a brace and it will work fine. This will transfer the load to the top of the I-Joist where it can be fully supported without tearing the I-joist apart. However, if this is a sealed area so that you cannot modify the I-Joists, then you will need to find some other method to support your shelving / loft project.

        Note that the above has nothing to do with the size of your I-joists or the span length, but is just to cover attaching to them. Here's a link to a pdf with a chart on loads / sizes:

        http://www.google.com/url?sa=t...vm=bv.61535280,d.cWc

        Scroll down about 6 pages or so to the "floor load" chart. If you can see what size joists you have and how they are spaced, this chart will tell you what kind of load you can carry bases on your span. The thing is, in most cases the I-joists will be engineered to carry the load that is already there and while there will be a safety margin built-in, it's rare for them to be overbuilt. Even so, if you have attic access to the I-joists, You could add blocking in the load area or even add bracing to carry some of the load up to the roof rafters.

        Overall, it should be possible to find some method to use the overhead framing as support for your loft area - especially if you are going to use it for relatively lightweight items.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Jaybee,


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10500 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Have a Bedroom above garage,...Hopefully (after other problems I'm finding) there is insulation in there, I know some plumbing is in there...After thorough reading of right ways to build with EL( engineered lumber). I might be able to to add some overhead support after placement of web blocking etc..... I'm sure some folks reading this stuff think maybe I plan a little overbuild (I did make birdhouse's out of Ipe, the woodpeckers not happy about it though) but I figure its better to get it right the first time...

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: measure2,

         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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