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        Fixing Improperly installed Iron Balusters Sign In/Join 
        posted
        The wife and I just bought our house last year, and one of the selling points was the iron balusters they used on the stairs (house was completely redone top to bottom before we bought it.) Well, since moving in and living in the home, we've found out that the balusters were installed wrong. They drilled holes in the top hand rail, doesn't appeared they epoxied them in however. That's an easy fix, its the bottom that's the problem. They did not drill into the stair tread at all, they just placed some epoxy onto the bottom of the baluster shoe and stuck it down. Well now several have come loose, and a couple have even fallen out. The balusters are not long enough to simply drill into the treads and make it right. I'd have to buy all new, longer balusters to do so and that's not in the budget at this time.

        Does anyone have any other way of attaching the bottom of the baluster more securely? I don't want to just re-epoxy the lose ones because I fear they will just come loose again. We have a baby on the way, so I really need to get these fixed so they will be safe.
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jul 01, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        in the immortal words of Mike Holmes... "Take it down, take it all down. Here we go again..."

        conceivably, you could scout out some little iron cups that would hold the bottom of the balusters, screw them in, and refit all the balusters into them. I know not where. perhaps there is a size of galvanized pipe cap that would work? if so, the rounded tops of the caps would have to be ground down on a grinding wheel so they'd sit flat.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5769 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I found these, but I feel like they would be visually unappealing. But better than the current setup I suppose.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Mole644,

         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jul 01, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        You could find a flat piece of metal to lay on the tread (screwed to tread) then tack weld the balusters to the flat piece.?
        Or.
        Weld and cap.?
        I would be more worried, if this is wrong then what else is too.?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 837 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        You got to love these double post.?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 837 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Ron, I don't have access to a welder so that's out, solid idea though!

        Here are some pictures to give a better idea:

        1
         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jul 01, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        bottom of shoe and baluster

         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jul 01, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Here you can see where some of the shoes have a ton of epoxy holding them in.

         
        Posts: 5 | Registered: Jul 01, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        that's just nasty. you might have to refinish the treads when it's all done. another reason to check on references.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5769 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Mole, this is kind of a wild shot but maybe it will help.

        I assume there were no disclaimers as to warrantability when you bought the house?

        Can you contact the previous homeowners to get information on the contractor who did the baluster project, determine if the homeowners received any kind of warranty, and if so, for how long and, critically, was that warranty transferable on sale?

        If not, if you could at least get the contractor's name you could file a BBB complaint (although the BBB doesn't really have any regulatory authority), determine if the contractor is licensed, and then contact the state licensing authority to file a complaint. This isn't just a cosmetic issue; it's one of safety issues.

        Doesn't help solve the immediate problem, but it might in the long term result in some action against, or even possibly a warranty claim against the contractor.

        If the contractor is an Angie's List contractor, contact them and file a complaint as well. I read somewhere else here on this Forum that someone did that and the contractor was temporarily removed from the acceptable list, or some similar action was taken.

        That's strictly a private arrangement though, so it isn't going to solve your problem. Still, it might help someone else avoid this contractor.

        Something else that might help is to run litigation checks in the county in which the contractor's business was incorporated or established, as well as surrounding counties, to determine if there are lawsuits against it.

        Lastly, I don't know if that kind of work would require inspection by the local building and code department, but you might check it out. If the contractor did other work, perhaps that ancillary work might have triggered an inspection. You could also make it clear to that building department that the work was faulty. Might make a difference if the contractor does work in your area again.

        Seems to me that because the unstable balusters are a safety issue, it that may lead to a higher level of responsibility (or in this case lack thereof) if you can get any regulatory agencies involved.

        I don't have the technical expertise to offer any remediation advice though.
         
        Posts: 1923 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        No problem.....
        Cut the epoxy away.
        Loosen the screws and make sure everything can be aligned.
        Holding the shoes in place drill a small hole on the left and right side at a slight angle in the bottom fold of the shoe.
        Using small black screws secure the shoe to the floor, and re tighten the screws to the baluster.
        Note; get screws that will match the baluster screw....
         
        Posts: 837 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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