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        Cool way to give back DIYers. Sign In/Join 
        posted
        DIY Friends,
        If you're on the east coast and want to make a difference in people's lives here is a great way to spend a long weekend or a week; working with the Appalachia Service Project making poor and elderly people's homes warmer, safer, drier.

        https://www.facebook.com/ASPJonesville

        It would be kind of cool to have a meet up in Jonesville of the regulars that post here and spend some time working together. I'm in a couple of the pictures, we went out a few weeks ago.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 606 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        great things you guys are doing...


        https://www.youtube.com/*****?v=vn7bkncf1_E


         
        Posts: 3843 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        How appropriate that you posted this truly worthwhile activity reflecting the goodness of people while down on the Knitting forum some spammers or bots are reflecting just the opposite.

        How long have you been involved in this public service work?

        And, are you going to tell us which of the photos you're in or shall we guess?

        Again, kudos to you for this involvement. Jonesville is a bit too far for me, but it would be nice if you could get together with any others from the Forum who might be in that area.

        How are decisions made which projects to tackle? Which homes, etc.? Who provides the supplies? Just curious how an organization like this is run.

        Thanks for sharing and best wishes to all the folks involved in this project.
         
        Posts: 1733 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        The people at ASP pick the projects. We did an exercise on our first night there looking over applications to decide which projects they should do. All were worthy, at this point they do about 1 out of every 4 projects due to the number of volunteers and the money they have.
        I was working on the project called "The Hop" in November and I'm in one of the group shots.

        ASP provides the supplies, though our group has taken up supplies to assist. Part of the volunteer fee you pay for room and board includes $25 a day to buy materials. They also get grants and donations. My employer pays $750 to two non-profits a year that I provide at least 50 hours of volunteer work to in a calendar year. The Scouts get one of my grants and ASP will get the other this year.

        I was a board member with Loudoun County HFH back in the 1990's before we moved to NC. I've worked with Christmas in April, HFH Wake County, Katrina disaster relief and now ASP.

        Our church is planning some Thursday - Sunday trips in January and March back to Jonesville. ASP also has year round centers in WV and KY. During the summer they use space in schools for lodging and run programs with HS and college aged kids. After listening to some fellow volunteers I think I'll avoid helping during the summer as it is just so crazy with so many volunteers. That and I get enough involvement with MS and HS kids in Scouts, I don't need to throw being on the look out for "purpling" on my list of things to worry about on a work week.

        I'll probably do the trip in March and a week long trip next fall. I do have to work for a living.

        You will get much more out of this than you put into it. It is very rewarding "work".


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 606 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Your employer must have a good sense of community support, as you also obviously do as well. I had to chuckle when I thought of any of my employers funding for something like the projects on which you've worked. Just wouldn't happen, although the larger ones mandated donations to United Way.

        Had to google "purpling"; it wasn't a term with which I was familiar. Interesting characterization of a natural phenomenon, but I wouldn't want that on my list of responsibilities either.

        How is it determined who has the experience to do which tasks? Is there training involved? I notice a number of teenagers so I assume that they work as apprentices or with training?

        I think volunteers do get a lot out of their work, as do the recipients, probably many of whom could never afford the work otherwise.
         
        Posts: 1733 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        GS,
        Our team was broken up into two four person teams. I was working with a husband and wife team that had been on dozens of these trips and a friend of theirs who also has been on dozens of trips. The other team had my brother, very experienced having done many trips to Mississippi after Katrina and Maine on something similar to ASP. The other folks on the team included a retired guy with a large number of trips under his belt and two sisters, one of which I've worked with a lot on building projects at church. Her sister was kind of a newby at the whole thing.

        The teams tend to spread the newbys between teams so you don't have a bunch of inexperienced people trying to do things they don't have a clue about. Our teams were pretty heavy on experience.

        I hadn't heard of purpling until I went to ASP, apparently it is a pretty common term in church youth groups. My 17 year old daughter had heard of it from youth group.

        I work for a very large corporation (200,000+ employees). One that probably touches your life every day, if not us one of our other competitors. The volunteer grants and matching grants (up to $1000 per employee per year to non-profits + $5000 per employee per year to colleges and universities) is how they determine where to put most of their philanthropy. I suppose I could give via work to the United Way, but I can't recall the last time they had a United Way drive. The local United Way won't give to the BSA so I won't filter my donations through them. I'll give to the organizations I support directly.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Sparky617,


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 606 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Congrats on the work being done by you and your group. Always a fine read when articles like this are posted.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1392 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Sparky617, thanks for the information on volunteering. Sounds like these are well organized programs. Not only is it a way to help people in need but also a way to train those who want to help others.

        Sounds like a lot of folks have some really good experience to share.

        I don't disagree with anything you've observed about United Way. We don't give to them either. There's enough administration even in some of the best charities without involving an umbrella organization.

        I will say though that United Way's 211 program is helpful. When I wanted to find a Veterans' organization to which I could donate a lot of my sister's furniture, they told me of one which was very responsive, and even came in the house and removed the contents. Salvation Army required that we move everything outside for accessibility.

        I can understand there could be liability issues with workers entering a house for donations, but some of what we donated was workout equipment, far too heavy and bulky for us to move outside.

        It's good to know that some corporations are putting money into worthwhile projects.
         
        Posts: 1733 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I posted a note in our church bulletin looking for members that were remodeling their kitchens to see if we could get their cabinets, counters, sinks etc. We struck gold in the first 24 hours. Someone is moving and offered up their washer, dryer and a refrigerator that they can't use in their new place. Another member offered up some cabinets from their kitchen they are remodeling. How cool is that?

        Hopefully it will work out, we rehung an upper cabinet at the house I was working on that was a strong candidate for the landfill. It was better than nothing, though an open shelf would have actually been an improvement.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 606 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        That's a great idea to post in a church bulletin. It's too bad ASP can't connect with all the cabinets and appliances that are discarded on the DIY shows, but I know that (a) transportation would be an issue, and (b) there seems to be some desire to (as Nona wrote elsewhere) take a sledge hammer to things and revel in destruction.

        Among other things for which I wanted to find a good home when I was disposing of my sister's things were a washer and dryer, both in good working order. A friend knew a guy who was interested, but he wanted her to take photos, wanted all sorts of details so he could research them, and decide if he really wanted them....for free.

        I think people truly in need are more willing and desirous of receiving assistance. When you have very little, or nothing in terms of appliances, a working appliance is a major step upward.

        Since your church seems to do a lot of charitable work, you might be interested in a project that my father's church has undertaken for the last several years.

        Every year in April church members, family and/or friends donate anything they no longer need or want...electronics, clothing, appliances, furniture. Photos of large items are posted on a bulletin board; anyone interested makes direct conact with the donors for pickup.

        They also sponsor a local charity which informs its members of these free offerings, on the first day of the giveaway. The second day is open to the public.

        Unfortunately, word has gotten around and some of these folks come with large garbage bags and make several trips back and forth to the cars. Last year they were virtually "wiped out" in a few hours. It's suspected some people have been reselling things at garage sales.

        Still, there are many people who are grateful and do benefit from these good will donations.

        I'm also curious as to whether your employer (and I'm not asking the name) made the charitable decisions on its own or was there a movement by the employees to create this kind of support?
         
        Posts: 1733 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        GS,
        The program has existed for many years, since before my current employer bought my previous company. The program isn't unusual for large US companies, ours made a pretty strong effort about 5 years ago to publicize it to increase participation. My Scout Troop currently has three of us from our company so that makes up a significant portion of our annual troop budget.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 606 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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