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            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  General Home Improvement    I need some tips on installing exterior sheathing.
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        I need some tips on installing exterior sheathing. Sign In/Join 
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted
        As a follow-on to my question about removing sidewall shingles
        ( discussion re: removing sidewall shingles ), I'd like to make sure I'm installing the new sheathing properly.

        Near the base of my downspout, water gets up under the shingles and soaks the backer board Water problem at base of downspout I've already replaced the backer board and shingles in that area once, but haven't solved the water problem. I detached the downspout so I could remove the shingles behind it. When the downspout is attached, water goes down the drain without backing up (I just stuck a garden hose in there and ran it full blast and there was no backup). Perhaps the gutter is overflowing at that end.
        I'm going to try to solve the cause of that area getting wet, but, as a backup, is there anything I can do while I'm re-sheathing to protect the materials behind the siding?

        I'm planning on using 1/2" CDX plywood. I've heard that a horizontal installation is preferable. However, there would be fewer open seams if I installed the plywood vertically. Does it really matter?

        To me, the way the sidewall sheathing sits on top of the floor sheathing looks wrong.
        Sidewall sheathing sits on floor sheathing.
        I thought that the exterior sheathing was supposed to extend below the sill-plate. As you can see in the picture though, the sheathing stops above the joist and the floor. The joist and the floor are actually proud of the sheathing in some spots, so it would be tricky to make the sidewall sheathing cover the joist and the sill plate. But, again, it doesn't look right, so I'd like suggestions on how to make it right.

        Since I have this opportunity, with so much of the framing exposed, are there measures I could take to protect the structure (water repellant, flashing, whatever...)?

        Any other suggestions?

        Thanks in advance.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: SturdyNail,
         
        Posts: 289 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        In looking over your pictures I suspect the water damage you see isn't from the downspouts but from water splashing up from the ground. Your grade is very close to the wood members of your house. This could be from your gutters overflowing. Can you do anything to lower the grade around your house?

        Strength wise it would be best to have the plywood or OSB sheathing come down over the rim joist. Without installing something on the 2x4's in your walls to pad out the thickness I'm not sure how you would do it. In Western NY I'm guessing that Tropical Storms and Hurricanes aren't a major concern, Nor'easters might be a problem. The other challenge in padding out the walls would be trim around your windows and doors.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Sparky617,


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 720 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        Sparky617, thanks for your ideas.
        It's hard to believe, but at the time I replaced shingles in that area a couple of years ago, the earth was actually up and over the lower edge of the shingles. I moved dirt away from the house just to see a little bit of the foundation. In one way, that was an improvement, but it created a negative grade near the house. Properly re-grading my lot would be a big (expensive) job.

        The windows on that wall need to be repaired or replaced, so it would be an OK time to laminate a spacer on the studs to put the studs on the same plane as the rim joist.
        How much of the rim joist should I cover? Should I also cover the sill plate?

        Thanks again.
         
        Posts: 289 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I'm not a professional so take my advice for what you paid for it. Given the proximity to the ground, I'd probably use pressure treated plywood on the lower 2 feet and cover the sill plate and the rim joist. Then above you could use regular CDX or OSB.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 720 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        Sparky617, I'm glad you suggested the pressure treated ply. I was thinking about doing that, but had some reservations. Now, when my neighbors come up and ask me "what the he!! are you doing that for?", I'll just tell them "Sparky told me to do it." Smile

        I'm also thinking of hitting the sill plate and rim joist with some deck preservative or some such thing. Do you think there will be value in doing that?

        I do appreciate your rates!
         
        Posts: 289 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        In looking at the pictures, it looks like the sill plate is PT wood. I'll leave it to the pros that post here to weigh in on whether adding a coating now will be of any benefit. My limited web search didn't come up with anything, though I didn't dig too deep.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 720 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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