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        posted
        I need to know if it is okay to use a foam brush to apply the poly or is it better to use a regular paint brush? I have always wondered which one would be better. If you know please let me know so that I could apply it right. Thank you and have a nice day.
         
        Posts: 7 | Location: United States | Registered: Apr 06, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        You can use either - as long as the bristle brush is a soft type that is made for poly. Overall, I'd recommend a good quality bristle brush. The foam brushes are easy to use but usually start to spread out quickly - making them OK for small areas but not larger ones. Get a good bristle brush made for poly and make sure you have some thinner to clean it out.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10153 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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        Jaybee is right, but try this, I've been doing it for years, get a clean lint free rag, an old t shirt works well, dilute your poly about 25% with acetone, naptha, or mineral spirits. with acetone giving the fastest dry time and mineral spirits, the slowest. Wipe the diluted poly on the surface in the direction of the grain, putting on a thin coat. It will take longer to reach the film thickness that you get with a brush, but you wont get runs, sags, or brush marks
        I've used spray equipment and brushes but always go back to wiping it on. now my brushes and paint sprayer (which is a professional brand ) just take up space with an occasional use

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: nona,
         
        Posts: 2504 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I will have to try to apply with a rag I never really tried that technique before. Do I really need the acetone to thin it though?


        quote:
        Originally posted by Jaybee:
        You can use either - as long as the bristle brush is a soft type that is made for poly. Overall, I'd recommend a good quality bristle brush. The foam brushes are easy to use but usually start to spread out quickly - making them OK for small areas but not larger ones. Get a good bristle brush made for poly and make sure you have some thinner to clean it out.
         
        Posts: 7 | Location: United States | Registered: Apr 06, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        you can use any of the thinners I listed, but you will have to thin the poly or it could be messy. cut your rag into pieces about 4 X 4 inchs
         
        Posts: 2504 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Tried the foam brushes once and that is all it took. Maybe there is a place to use them but not with finishes. I use a thin bristle brush and use multiple layers of THIN coats. It is best to have the piece in the horizontal position vs.verticle. After two coats I either sand w/ 600 grit or use 0000 steel wool. I never use "tack cloth" because it will leave a wax residue. Wipe the piece down with a damp (not wet)cloth of rubbing alcohol to remove the sanded particles and grit/steel left. It evaporates fairly fast. 15-20 minutes it is ready to re-coat. As a top coat I use spray poly of like kind to get that streak free look. If using a semi-gloss or satin finish start first with a high gloss then semi/satin as later steps. The grain will POP out better.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: redoverfarm,
         
        Posts: 1736 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        tack cloth is the devil's Kleenex. a rag soaked in mineral spirits is what I swear by.

        when brushing poly, always brush the same direction, with the grain. I finish up with a wet brush and long, long strokes, as long as I can get to doing the piece end to end. wipe the droolage off the edges, and move on to the next piece.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5521 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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