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Stud Wall Framing in Basement

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Nov 23, 2013, 04:56 PM
BJDewar
Stud Wall Framing in Basement
I am planning on finishing my basement. There is a large steel I-beam that runs the length on the basement. I would prefer to build a stud wall directly beneath it down to the floor. Is this advisable? See picture for I-beam. Thanks for any advice.


Nov 23, 2013, 06:58 PM
Sparky617
It won't be an issue to build your wall below the steel beam. If it works with your desired layout it is a great option.

The wall won't be taking the load of the beam, that will rest with the foundation and any posts that are under the beam.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Nov 23, 2013, 08:22 PM
swschrad
or you can build your wall around the beam so it goes all the way up and anchors firmly to the joists on top.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 24, 2013, 08:03 AM
CommonwealthSparky
It "could" be a problem if by building as you propose that a height issue could come into play. As in playing whack-a-mole with your brainbox when passing though. But you can judge that as you lay out your work.
I too would box around the steel, using more lumber, but a more steady attachment of structure. Good luck.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Nov 26, 2013, 10:44 AM
Sparky617
If the wall isn't too long and has perpendicular walls coming off of it you can glue your top plate to the beam to hold it in place. Liquid Nails will keep it in place. If the wall is long and doesn't have any walls coming off of it you'll probably want to attach it to the structure. I don't know if you can drill into the beam to attach the top plate. This site says you can drill into them. But, it won't be easy.

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/t...der-ibeam-20074.html


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Nov 26, 2013, 12:09 PM
swschrad
it is a religion with me that you do NOT monkey with a structural steel beam in any form or fashion. paint it, maybe. put a nice oak box around the support posts, yah. but the beam stays pristine.

put a nice box around it if you don't like post-archaic modernistic design, and drywall it. put a plate rack on the box and hang tcotchkes if you wish, but have a bucket of Dramamine at the head of the stairs for visitors.

I had two closet walls in DeBasement before we ripped it to the block and redid it that were not pinned to the joists or the floor. that sort of thing is not very stable. I blew a strip of framing nails and a handful of popgun fasteners into one closet, and I like the way the door closes without cracking the walls now.

grew up in the days of broadcasting in which telco rules still prevailed... if you can move it with bulldozers or dynamite, it ain't finished yet.

that works in your benefit in construction, too.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Nov 26, 2013, 01:08 PM
Sparky617
I seriously doubt that a couple of screws into the beam are going to affect the structural integrity of the house. But I won't mess with your religious beliefs. Once cured, liquid nails would do the trick. The Casa De Sparky has a glue lam beam so attachment isn't a problem here.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.