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Should I treat sole plate & rim joist before covering them?

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Oct 22, 2013, 11:44 PM
SturdyNail
Should I treat sole plate & rim joist before covering them?
Hello,

In June of this year, I raised a similar question when working on the side of my house (re: Topic from June 24th, 2013 )

On the side of the house, I was able to cover the rim joist and sole plate and another 10" up the wall with pressure treated ply.
Now that I'm at the back of the house though, I won't be able to easily do that. In order to cover the rim-joist and partway up the wall with pressure treated ply, I would have to place 1/2" spacers on all of the wall studs for the sheathing to be on the same plane as the rim-joist.
At this late time of year, I'm thinking that spacers will be too much effort (I'd need to make a new jamb extension for the window I'm installing).

My other choice is to just start the new sheathing where the old sheathing started (sitting on the plywood sub-floor).
I would still cover it with the house wrap and, eventually, it will be covered with an Azek band board.

Before I cover the rim-joist with house wrap, should I treat it with anything or just leave it as is?

Thanks in advance.

Sole Plate, Rim Joist, Floor, Siding

Oct 23, 2013, 02:02 AM
Jaybee
The only reason to cover it with any kind of plywood would be if you needed to bring the rim joist out to the same plane as the sheathing above. (can't really tell from the pic). If you have to do this, then it would not hurt to use PT plywood, but there is no reason to either.

You've got a good 6" to 8" of exposed block, there is no reason to cover the rim joist with anything save housewrap and your final siding material.


Jaybee
Oct 23, 2013, 08:20 AM
SturdyNail
Thanks Jaybee,
I do have exposed block in that area, because I dug it out (and created a negative grade doing it). Other areas don't have as much "breathing room".
Oct 23, 2013, 08:56 AM
Jaybee
Digging out is the only approach that really works for this. If the wooden portion of your house is below grade, it's eventually going to rot. Covering it with a skin of PT will delay the process, but not avoid it. Short of replacing all below ground framing with ground contact treated material, any of your framing below ground will eventually fail.


Jaybee
Oct 23, 2013, 12:51 PM
SturdyNail
Thanks.
At the seams (where the rim-joist meets the sub-floor that the exterior sheathing rests on), would there be value in covering it with peel and stick flashing (to keep out the drafts)?

Also, would you mount your plywood sheathing horizontally (to gain strength) at the expense of creating seams that are not backed by wall studs?

Thanks again.
Oct 23, 2013, 02:48 PM
CommonwealthSparky
Our local codes require a foam roll the width of the plate between said plate and block work. Not that it is of any help to you now. Keeps bugs out and a draft reducer all rolled into one. For future reference on your part. Nice work in the photo, for sure. Big Grin
And stuff each inside cavity of the rimboard with fiberglass.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Oct 23, 2013, 05:12 PM
Jaybee
quote:
Originally posted by SturdyNail:
Thanks.
At the seams (where the rim-joist meets the sub-floor that the exterior sheathing rests on), would there be value in covering it with peel and stick flashing (to keep out the drafts)?

One of those - "it will not hurt but not really worth it" kind of things. You will be better off sealing inside - caulk the bap between the subfloor and the underside of the drywall. The drywall actually makes a better barrier than the exterior sheathing if you are trying to seal the house and keep out drafts.

Also, would you mount your plywood sheathing horizontally (to gain strength) at the expense of creating seams that are not backed by wall studs?

Absolutely not! No harm in mounting horizontally, but not if you are going to end the plywood on air. Plywood is just as strong in either direction and if nailed properly, is more than strong enough so that you do not have to stagger seams.

Thanks again.



Jaybee
Oct 23, 2013, 10:19 PM
SturdyNail
CommonwealthSparky, Yeah. It's a little late for me to sandwich foam between the plate and the block. I won't be jacking up the house any time soon :-)

Jaybee, I'll install vertically then. If I installed horizontally, I would have blocked behind all open seams. Vertically will be a lot less hassle.
BTW. I'm using screws (I have an impact driver, but no nail gun)