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        posted
        Had the stone mason drop by last Saturday to check out basement windows, one without lintel under the 2x6 sill that floor joists rest on, when he looked at the other window which did have a full 12" wide lintel spanning the window he said it was wrong one since you could see "TOP" stamped on the side facing out, he said this was 6" wide 12" tall block and that rebar placement in it was meant to use this as 6" wide block ,not to be layed on side and used as 12" wide.
        Is this common???????
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Some one screwed up.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 890 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        It's pretty common to see the 'top' turned to the side. The most common lintel dimension is an 8x8 (to match up with block dimensions). While the lintel is square in cross section the steel inside is shaped so that it should be oriented in one direction.

        So yes, it was installed incorrectly.

        But before you panic it also may not matter. IIRC, you are spanning a 3' window well? That doesn't need a 12" lintel. As I had mentioned in another post on this if you have a correctly installed and sized wood framing above that 3' opening, you really do not need any stone lintel at all. So it's possible that you have an oversized lintel that's installed sideways that is more than you need anyway.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Jaybee,


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10483 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks Jaybee, good to know, area above is one story with large roof (2 story vaulted ceiling) that slopes down to that wall so it does bear some extra weight depending on snow amounts.
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        As mentioned in other posts on your house you probably should have a structural engineer come in and review all your concerns. It will probably cost you several hundred dollars for him to look over the house and prepare a report with recommendations for repairs if required. If for nothing else than your peace of mind.

        That said, if there is no evidence that the house is settling in the areas of your concern, no cracks in the foundation, windows on that wall function easily and no major cracks in the drywall it is probably fine and will continue to be fine for a very long time.

        If you want to spend some money to give yourself peace of mind without the engineer, get a steel lintel put it on the ledge above the window and install pressure treated blocking up to the floor I-joists to carry the load across the window opening. If you finish the basement install a 2x4 wall under these floor joists and make it a bearing wall to help carry the load, install a double plate and if desired add a header over the window to carry the load as well.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 890 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Sparky617:
        As mentioned in other posts on your house you probably should have a structural engineer come in and review all your concerns. It will probably cost you several hundred dollars for him to look over the house and prepare a report with recommendations for repairs if required. If for nothing else than your peace of mind.

        That said, if there is no evidence that the house is settling in the areas of your concern, no cracks in the foundation, windows on that wall function easily and no major cracks in the drywall it is probably fine and will continue to be fine for a very long time.

        If you want to spend some money to give yourself peace of mind without the engineer, get a steel lintel put it on the ledge above the window and install pressure treated blocking up to the floor I-joists to carry the load across the window opening. If you finish the basement install a 2x4 wall under these floor joists and make it a bearing wall to help carry the load, install a double plate and if desired add a header over the window to carry the load as well.


        No noticeable cracks or problems found yet, will be framing under both windows and I think you mentioned doubling the plate on the other window.
        Just yanked old powder room vanity (cultured marble) and replacing it with granite top. Found back of cabinet poorly attached only at center, found two studs lined up near corners and attached a couple more screws there. Studs placement seemed to be for this and I wonder why the builder didn't use them.
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        If the vanity was sitting on the floor the attachment to the wall is there to keep it from moving. The floor will support it just fine. If it was wall hung, one screw is clearly not enough. I have a pedestal sink in our powder room, it is attached to the wall with two screws, but the bulk of the weight is carried by the pedestal. Upper cabinets clearly need more attachment to the walls than base cabinets.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 890 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Sparky617:
        If the vanity was sitting on the floor the attachment to the wall is there to keep it from moving. The floor will support it just fine. If it was wall hung, one screw is clearly not enough. I have a pedestal sink in our powder room, it is attached to the wall with two screws, but the bulk of the weight is carried by the pedestal. Upper cabinets clearly need more attachment to the walls than base cabinets.


        On the floor cabinet, once old vanity was off it was a bit wobbly. I replaced the stapled in plastic corner brackets with 3/4 wood triangles (glued & screwed) which firmed it up some and screws at back corners made it nice and sturdy for granite top.
         
        Posts: 106 | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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