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Rip cutting 2x4s

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Nov 12, 2013, 02:46 PM
dave_of_nj
Rip cutting 2x4s
I would like to rip cut 100 2x4s. Most cuts will be taper cuts. I am looking for the best way to do this so that I preserve the 3.5" side. My table saw cuts through about 3", so turning the board over to finish the cut makes for a jagged edge. Are there any other ways to do this? Thanks
Nov 12, 2013, 04:03 PM
Sparky617
How thick do you need these 2x4's to be? Are you ripping them in half and hope to use both halves?


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Nov 12, 2013, 05:47 PM
dave_of_nj
The thickness will vary by board. Some may be as thick as 1.25" down to .25". The tapers will be different for each board too.

I only need to use the side that I am tapering. I can discard the other side.
Nov 12, 2013, 07:49 PM
Jaybee
Rent a table saw with a 12" blade. 100 rips is a large enough so that the rental fee can be justified both in time saved and smoothness of cut. This cut could also be made with a large bandsaw - but it would have to be a big one - not likely to find this at any rental outlet.

Since each piece is going to be unique, doubtful that you could find a mill to make the cuts for you.

With a regular 10" table saw, you are limited to just under 3" depth of cut. You don't mention what you are using these for but is it possible that you could use a ripped piece that is just 3" wide? If 3" would work for your final use, you could first make a standard 3" flat rip on each 2x4 turning it into an actual 1 1/2" x 3". Then all your tapered rips could be made in one pass on a typical 10" saw.


Jaybee
Nov 13, 2013, 11:32 AM
dave_of_nj
Thanks. Good ideas. Someone told me that when you rip cut 2x4s you have to glue them down or nail them to something quickly to prevent warping or twisting. Is that correct? I was thinking of doing the cutting operation like an assembly line which would be much more efficient than one at a time.

quote:
Originally posted by Jaybee:
Rent a table saw with a 12" blade. 100 rips is a large enough so that the rental fee can be justified both in time saved and smoothness of cut. This cut could also be made with a large bandsaw - but it would have to be a big one - not likely to find this at any rental outlet.

Since each piece is going to be unique, doubtful that you could find a mill to make the cuts for you.

With a regular 10" table saw, you are limited to just under 3" depth of cut. You don't mention what you are using these for but is it possible that you could use a ripped piece that is just 3" wide? If 3" would work for your final use, you could first make a standard 3" flat rip on each 2x4 turning it into an actual 1 1/2" x 3". Then all your tapered rips could be made in one pass on a typical 10" saw.

Nov 13, 2013, 12:17 PM
Jaybee
If you rip pressure treated stock, you will have some warping issues once the material gets to the thinner areas. This should not be as much of a problem with dried studs as material. Still possible for a few pieces, but not very likely.

If you are going to store the newly ripped material for a while before installing, just make sure you stack it neatly - use the bulk of all the pieces to hold everything straight.

Your assembly line idea is the way to go but with all the different sizes you mentioned will slow that way down. Plus, you may need to label each ripped piece so you know where you took it's measurements from.


Jaybee
Nov 14, 2013, 03:09 AM
Frodo
push sticks
Nov 14, 2013, 08:14 AM
CommonwealthSparky
I would think any type of lumber will twist after a cut like that described. Is not a straight grain 2x4 {salty in price} on the market that reduces twisting after cutting?


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Nov 14, 2013, 08:58 AM
Jaybee
It's really a crap shoot - within any grade of lumber you will find good and bad stuff. In many cases, the best of the stuff in the lower grade material is better than the worst of the stuff in the high grade material.

Most people know this, which is why if you head to the big box store to buy lumber you'll see neat, orderly stacked lumber in the back with lots of loose, warped boards tossed around in front and on top after being culled by others.


Jaybee
Nov 14, 2013, 01:52 PM
CommonwealthSparky
I would think that warping would be present in any grade stock as you have stated.
I also was thinking of hemlock {I think} as being the specie of lumber that will stay true when cut. I think an old timer told me that way back when. But might be a chore trying to locate if this were true.
Yes the two local yards we deal with has those piles as well. Must be a riot for who ever does the inventory reductions... We call them rockin chair bottoms. Got to go all this thinking gave me a headache.


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Nov 16, 2013, 01:32 PM
Frodo
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

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