DIY Message Boards
Subflooring kitchen remodel

This topic can be found at:
http://boards.diynetwork.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/9221916776/m/2513993008

Jan 11, 2014, 02:39 PM
doingitright
Subflooring kitchen remodel
I have a contractor remodeling my kitchen. The took the old floor and subflooring up laid new plywood, cement board and new tilegrout. The tile was not laid properly. The crew removed the tile and cement board but told me the subflooring did not need to be replaced. I noticed a few places where the plywood was splitting and cracked it did not seem that stable but hey assured my it would be okay and laid new cement board. From the basement rafters underneath the kitchen I can also see where the plywood is split. Should I make the contractor take back up the cement board and replace the plywood in theses areas or for the whole floor?
Jan 11, 2014, 03:13 PM
GardenSprite
Is this the same contractor who did your bathroom tile?
Jan 11, 2014, 03:23 PM
Sparky617
Is the plywood split the whole way through or is it just a split in the visible layer of the plywood? Subfloor plywood isn't AC grade plywood so some voids and spits in a single layer are to be expected. If it cracked the whole way through though it is a problem.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Jan 11, 2014, 03:25 PM
Sparky617
Here is a link that describes the different grades of plywood.

http://www.ezwoodshop.com/plywood/plywood-grades.html


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Jan 11, 2014, 04:16 PM
Jaybee
I think Sparky has the right idea. Since plywood is layered with the grain going in opposite directions, it is almost impossible for it to split al the way through. About the only thing that can cause this is a major impact - like a forklift running through it on delivery.

If you can see a split on the top layer and even on the bottom, remember that on a typical 3/4" subfloor there will be 7 layers total.

It sounds like other than the mess-up with the first tile install that they are doing what they should.


Jaybee
Jan 12, 2014, 08:02 AM
CommonwealthSparky
Most types of plywood have one good side and one not so good as well. Usually the inferior side is placed "bottom side down".
With the price of plywood being what it is Advantech is the subflooring most install. Not that this helps you.


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Jan 20, 2014, 10:41 PM
ashtonparker436
How thick is your kitchen subfloor?
Feb 06, 2014, 09:37 AM
measure2
One thing you should make sure they don't do is raise floor thickness (subfloor and tile) so that dishwasher is trapped. This happened to my neighbor. He had contractor put in tile floor ( replaced old vinyl I think),then several months later (Murphy's law) the dishwasher died and when repairmen/techs tried sliding it out they found it to be literally tiled in, could not be lowered any and had to be disassembled under counter.