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        posted
        I am building a closet with sliding bypass style doors in a room that is used as an office currently. The closest will go wall to wall about 2 feet out from the back wall. My question is do I need to remove sheet rock to install the base 2x4 that will be the base of the header?

        For the side walls that form the rough opening of the closet same question. Do the vertical 2x4 that start each short wall need to be embedded in the existing walls?
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Not sure I am understanding your question correctly but let me try.

        Normally there is a header in the front of the closet opening. That needs to be set to the heigth of the rough opening called for by the door manufacturer plus 3/4" for the facia trim. This needs to have a short wall above to affix the drywall to. There needs to be a top plate attahed to the ceiling (see below) Generally there is not doors tall enough to reach from the floor to ceiling thus the drop front.

        On the sides you will need to determine the rough opening of the doors and each side needs to be built out like a framed wall even on each side plus 1-1/2" to accomidate the facia or trim 3/4" on each side. The header that goes across the top of the closet opening should be set on cripple studs made into the longer side walls (of the face)to hold the header. There needs to be studs from the header to a top plate attached to the ceiling. Since this is from wall to wall you will basicly have no side walls to speak of like a buildout closet.

        Not knowing the rough opening needed for the doors or the width of the room that is about the best I can do for now.

        Maybe this will help. http://www.diynetwork.com/how-...-a-closet/index.html

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: redoverfarm,
         
        Posts: 1770 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Question #1 I assume you mean the top plate that will attach to your present ceiling. You do not have to remove the drywall unless it would make the project easier in any way shape or form. Be sure to locate lumber up above to attach the plate to when fastening. Be it screws or nails. {Screws would be easier}.
        Question #2 You can start with your first 2x4 placed next to the present drywall.
        Others may build differently with better ideas though. Good luck. Big Grin


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Wow that was fast, the pixels didn't even dry yet on my post and I got an answer!

        I actually got an answer with more searches. You also understood my question and gave good detail as well.

        http://www.familyhandyman.com/...to-wall-closet/print

        Specifically look at picture 4 where he is gluing and screwing the header base stud directly on the ceiling sheetrock. My question was whether or not I should remove the sheetrock and nail the this stud to the floor joists (we have 2-story house). I see that he just nailed (and glued, didn't know needed to do that) right to the sheetrocked ceiling. Looks like he uses toggle bolts too.

        The same question applied to the side walls. Should I remove the sheetrock of the existing walls in order to start the closet walls from inside the existing walls.

        Again in picture 3 he is nailing the wall stud directly on top of the existing sheetrock.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Gameengineer,
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
        Question #1 I assume you mean the top plate that will attach to your present ceiling. You do not have to remove the drywall unless it would make the project easier in any way shape or form. Be sure to locate lumber up above to attach the plate to when fastening. Be it screws or nails. {Screws would be easier}.

        Yes, that's the term, "plate". Sorry I am a software developer who is too cheap to pay someone to build this thing. Plus I like construction jobs. This office room used to be an open family room. I built the wall with door to enclose it. The problem is that was years ago and I do not remember if I put the plates directly to the ceiling/walls or not. I probably just attached them to the walls over the sheetrock and didn't think twice about it like I am doing now.


        Question #2 You can start with your first 2x4 placed next to the present drywall.
        Others may build differently with better ideas though. Good luck. Big Grin
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        While nails & glue is pictured, [or screws as mention in pic #4] you could skip the glue part in my opinion. Just make sure you locate the lumber to drive those three in screws into.
        The pics show no drywall being removed before attaching lumber, so you would not have to remove ant either. Makes for a neater and a quicker job.
        Hey nothing about being a software engineer is uncool. Also great you are willing to tackle a basis sound and useful project on your time.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
        While nails & glue is pictured, [or screws as mention in pic #4] you could skip the glue part in my opinion. Just make sure you locate the lumber to drive those three in screws into.
        The pics show no drywall being removed before attaching lumber, so you would not have to remove ant either. Makes for a neater and a quicker job.


        Right, definitely was going to screw the plates into the floor joists.


        "Divide by ZERO, and what do you get?"
        You get a runtime crash in your software unless you catch it! Smile
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Methinks you are well on your way to that office closet. Good for you...


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Gameengineer:
        quote:
        Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
        While nails & glue is pictured, [or screws as mention in pic #4] you could skip the glue part in my opinion. Just make sure you locate the lumber to drive those three inch screws into.
        The pics show no drywall being removed before attaching lumber, so you would not have to remove any either. Makes for a neater and a quicker job.


        Right, definitely was going to screw the plates into the floor joists.


        "Divide by ZERO, and what do you get?"
        You get a runtime crash in your software unless you catch it! Smile

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks for the help Commonwealth and redoverfarm. This is going to be fun!

        Now I have to re-buy all the power tools that were stolen. Frown
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Sounds like CS has you onthe right track. Happy construction.

        PS: He may not have a framing member where the header goes and is cheating with Toggle bolts and glue. Not a good practice but sometimes done that way.
         
        Posts: 1770 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by redoverfarm:
        Sounds like CS has you onthe right track. Happy construction.

        PS: He may not have a framing member where the header goes and is cheating with Toggle bolts and glue. Not a good practice but sometimes done that way.


        Ah, ok. CS also mention not to use glue. So it sounds like screwing to the frame is good enough. I'll forgo the glue and toggle bolts. The toggle bolts seemed cheesy and structurally weak to me anyway.

        EDIT: The instructions in that link also show screwing to the sub floor. I wish! We have concrete floors where this is going. I have one of those nail guns that shoots nails into the concrete.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Gameengineer,
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        You would be rather surprised what toggles may be holding up on the big rock we live on. Big Grin
        They would hold well on their on and with a good structural adhesive added they could perform the intended task at hand. But a helper is a must if you would go that route.
        PS Toggles are called "Mollies" in these parts by many. Don't know why, a brand name maybe....

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
        You would be rather surprised what toggles may be holding up on the big rock we live on. Big Grin
        They would hold well on their on and with a good structural adhesive added they could perform the intended task at hand. But a helper is a must if you would go that route.
        PS Toggles are called "Mollies" in these parts by many. Don't know why, a brand name maybe....


        Learned another term, mollies. Now I won't sound so lame at Home Depot. Smile I know that the frames run perpendicular to the closet so I will have plenty of support to screw the header plate into. Since the closet is going to be 24" in depth I will not be hitting any studs in the side walls assuming they are 16" O.C. So mollies might be a good addition to give more support.
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        You can use Hilti or Ramset nail gun if you would like or use "tapcons" which ever you prefer. If you were unable to locate a structural member for the header to attach to then maybe adhesive and toggle bolts. Harder way around is to remove the drywall and put structural braces running from one floor joist/ceiling joist(2-story) to the other. But that is another story in itself.
         
        Posts: 1770 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by redoverfarm:
        Harder way around is to remove the drywall and put structural braces running from one floor joist/ceiling joist(2-story) to the other. But that is another story in itself.


        Yes that's exactly what I was wondering. I like the easier way of nailing plates directly to sheetrock without removing it. I thought for some reason leaving the sheetrock and attaching plates to it would be structurally unsound but it sounds like it is fine.

        I will use the nail gun on one closet wall because it is 30" or so. The other wall will be about 6" and it will probably snap it in half if I try to use the gun. That's what happened when I tried to nail down the short wall for the door of this room. I ended up just using anchor screws into the concrete. I'll just use those concrete anchor screws for the short closet wall too.
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        You guys have been very helpful! Thanks for the fun chat and great info.
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by redoverfarm:
        You can use Hilti or Ramset nail gun if you would like or use "tapcons" which ever you prefer. If you were unable to locate a structural member for the header to attach to then maybe adhesive and toggle bolts. Harder way around is to remove the drywall and put structural braces running from one floor joist/ceiling joist(2-story) to the other. But that is another story in itself.

        If I were constructing a closet using Hilti's or cap guns would not be used in 99.99% of the time. Overkill in residential use if structure [lumber] is present. [Just my 2 wheat pennies].


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Walking into a big box and asking for the "Molly" isle may be a real hoot. This might be a regional term, as many things in the construction industry are. But you never know. Big Grin


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1521 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Sorry, I know this is bad form by posting again in an old thread but it is mine so.... Smile

        Ok this construction project is really going to happen now. I have another question. On the wall that will become the main back wall for this wall to wall closet there are two outlets and one cable port. That is our main house cable port for our internet so I can't just cap it off. What should I do about the two outlets? Should I add a junction box, remove the outlet and wirenut the wires and add a cover plate? Or leave the outlets? (that would seem weird to have outlets in a closet, though.

        And what about the cable outlet? The cable comes in on the left wall which is an exterior wall, travels through this back wall and then up vertically from that outlet to the attic where is starts splitting off to individual rooms. At the very least I need to add a new cable outlet to the right wall of this room so that my son can hook up his XBox. Wink I guess one option is to "T" off this cable outlet and travel through the back wall and through the right wall and add a new cable outlet somewhere in the middle of that wall (where his desk will be located). I am assuming there are Cox will come out and add the splitter.
         
        Posts: 15 | Registered: Sep 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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