DIY Network

All Projects

TV Projects

    What Do You Want To Work On?

      What Activity Do You Want To Do?

        0

        Available Projects

        Get Results

        DIY Network /

        Message Boards

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Floors    bathroom floor
        Go
        New
        Find
        Notify
        Tools
        Reply
          
        bathroom floor Sign In/Join 
        Picture of swcret
        posted
        I have a bathroom floor that I want to lay new cork flooring on but here is my situation. the floor is two different heights the lower part is concrete floor the higher is wood. I know that I need to bring up the concrete floor even with my wooden side which is about 1 and 1/2" higher. Can I use plywood as my subfloor on the concrete side and if so what is the best way to attach it to the concrete floor.
         
        Posts: 6 | Registered: Apr 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        You will be better off to use a mortar product to raise the lower concrete section. Layering plywood is just going to make a breeding ground for mold and rot as moisture will find it's way in there. For that matter, cork is not the best for a bath, especially if it's a floating floor. Much better off with tile or vinyl.

        But to level the floor, use some thinset as a leveling compound.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10146 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        Sorry Jaybee, not going to work on this one.
        There's 1-1/2" height differance, way to much for thin set to fill.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 18000 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I'd put a vapor barrier down on the concrete, then one layer of treated plywood and one layer of standard plywood, and then refloor.

        you could put down sand mix concrete, but then you haven't solved the vapor pressure issue, water will still rise up if it's wet underneath. and of course, you would need a bonding primer before laying the sand mix, which won't do you any good if there is a plastic vapor barrier.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5512 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of swcret
        posted Hide Post
        Jaybee, thanks for reply and for the advice. I understand about the use of plywood not being a good choice. If I use thinset a my leveler won't it crack especially since I have build the floor up at least 1 and 1/2" to meet the existing floor?
         
        Posts: 6 | Registered: Apr 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Since you are going directly on top of a concrete floor the thinset will work as a leveler - even at 1-1/2". It is possible that this thickness will develop some small surface cracks as it cures but it will still work well as a leveling compound. You could also use a mortar mix for the major portion of the fill as it will be stronger, but either product will work.

        We've used thinset as a leveling compound for these thicknesses without any issues many times, although we were always adding another thinset layer and tile as a finished floor.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10146 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of swcret
        posted Hide Post
        what about the use of cement board? Has any one ever used it as a means to build a floor up? If I use the the vapor barrier between the existing concrete floor and my first sheet of treated plywood do I need to use a Hilti gun to keep my first layer from coming up or would you use construction adhesive?

        Thanks to everyone that has contributed suggestions.
         
        Posts: 6 | Registered: Apr 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        If you could forget about using tile on that floor One simple way to raise it and also have the floor feel warmer would be to lay a vapor barrier, use 3/4" Blue foam, then 3/4 T & G Advantech or Plywood.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 18000 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
          Powered by Social Strata  
         

            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Floors    bathroom floor

        © Scripps Networks 2009

        Advertisement

        Posting Guidelines

        • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
        • No off-topic or off-color postings.
        • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of DIY moderators.
        • No advertising is allowed.
        • Be nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
        • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political or religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by DIY.

        Full Guidelines

        For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.