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        How to identify late 1800's wood flooring Sign In/Join 
        posted
        We found a hardwood floor under some ugly flooring in the kitchen.
        Our flooring guy can't get out to look at it right now, and we have to finish it soon to keep it, and we don't know what kind of wood this is. It appears to not have any finish on it right now.
        Can anybody help me identify what type of wood this is? Its not heavy like a piece of oak, I'm wondering if its some sort of pine species as we have wide plank pine flooring (1863) that we've refinished in other rooms. However, this floor is different.
        Any advice is greatly appreciated!!!!!!

        Mystery wood Floor
         
        Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        From the knots, it looks like a typical pine T&G. It's still available - from flooring outlets not big box stores.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10354 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        So is it not worth keeping???
         
        Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        Is it T & G or just strips of wood.
        What's under it?
        How thick is it?


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 18032 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Yanno...it is T&G so maybe this was a replacement floor? Not sure what is under it.
         
        Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        It's prob 1/2 in thick. I'll look at it again later today and post a pic of the one piece that isn't attached.
         
        Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        No reason you can't keep it - depends on what style floor you want. Pine T&G can be sanded and refinished just like any other hardwood floor.

        Most likely you'll find that it's 3/4" thick.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10354 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks all! If it's T&G-it's not really that old? Trying to figure out the timeframe on the floors.
        I didn't measure, and you're prob right about 3/4 inch
        Thing we found odd about it-doesn't seem as soft as our other pine floors. My husband dragged a stove across it and it didn't dent at all, which is better as it will be a high traffic floor.
        Our wide plank pine floors would have had gouges.
         
        Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 04, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        there is, or should I say,"was" ? a wood called "dade county pine" It was grown in florida and was hard a a rock. It was impervious to termites, rot and nails unless holes were drilled for them first.
        What you are describing sure sounds like it
        I don't know your location, but if it's somewhere in the south and as old as you say it is, it may very well be Dade County Pine. If it is, you have a rare wood that you cannot get anymore as all repeat all, the trees were harvested years ago
        If it is D.C. pine just get it sanded and enjoy the fact that you have a rare wood floor

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: nona,
         
        Posts: 2541 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        also known as hard yellow pine. refinish and enjoy.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5775 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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