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Concrete Bird Bath - dirty!

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Jun 19, 2013, 06:30 PM
Goomba
Concrete Bird Bath - dirty!
Is there some way to clean a large concrete bird bath that's too heavy to be tilted & dumped? The garden hose has too little pressure to be effective at swirling out the debris. I searched but could not find any sort of gadget for this job.
Jun 19, 2013, 09:57 PM
beers1
I have 2 lrg concrete bird bath I bail out the dirty water and use my pink toilet cleaning brush for scrubbing it clean. the pink brush hangs next to my back faucet and the blue brush is in the front. works real good. after the scrubbing I turn the hose on with a nozzle that is adjustable to a strong shpritz and rinse it very good before filling it up. the cleaning is a ritual every 2-3 weeks , and filling with fresh water in between. in the winter I put a water heater into the bird bath so the birds have water when everything is frozen..
Jun 20, 2013, 10:43 AM
swschrad
stiff brush and a small amount of dishwashing detergent. rinse it several times before letting the birds back in.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Jun 20, 2013, 12:57 PM
Conrad
With a large birdbath, after it is clean and rinsed adding just a small amount of Clorox bleach to the new water keeps the algae from being an issue for a week or two. By small amount, just a capful (or two) depending on the size/amount of water. The birds don't mind either.
Jun 20, 2013, 03:11 PM
nona
O.K., I'll answer this in two parts so I wont have to type this over if the photo doesn't load. The second part will be a photo of a fountain that I've had for 50 years and moved from one house to another 3 times
I clean it by directing a as hard a stream of water that I can get out of my hose to skim the surface of the water in the fountain. this gets the water agitated enough that the sediment in the fountain washes out. I then fill it with fresh water and add a little household bleach. When the water gets algae in it , I add more bleach, keeping the water clear
I know that adding bleach is not recommended, but I've been doing it for 50+ years with no harm to the birds that come to drink and bathe.
We get cardinals, that nest in a tree nearby, come to the fountain as well as their chicks when they fledge. We also get bluebirds That nest in a bird house in my yard, sparrows, crows, robins, and others, even get a one eared raccoon now and then. We even got a black snake a couple of times
Anyhow, that's how we keep our fountain clean
Now I'll try to post the photo of the fountain using the method that garden sprite said to try
Jun 20, 2013, 03:12 PM
nona
Here's the photo (I hope ) of the fountain
http://s1290.photobucket.com/u....jpg.html?sort=3&o=1
Jun 20, 2013, 03:49 PM
Conrad
You know I just don't believe that "small amounts" of liquid laundry bleach are that harmful. This is what sailor friends on boats use to clean fruits and vegetables prior to eating (when from suspect sources) as well as keeping their water lines clean and bacteria free aboard their boats.
Jun 22, 2013, 07:27 AM
CommonwealthSparky
quote:
Originally posted by Conrad:
You know I just don't believe that "small amounts" of liquid laundry bleach are that harmful. This is what sailor friends on boats use to clean fruits and vegetables prior to eating (when from suspect sources) as well as keeping their water lines clean and bacteria free aboard their boats.

Most of us take a wee dram of it every time we hit the tap water. Eek
But back to the subject at hand we just take a Brillo pad and copious amounts of fresh water[once every two weeks] to ours and the Blue Jays never seem to mind...

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Jun 22, 2013, 08:44 AM
GardenSprite
I wonder though how we can tell on a short term basis what is the actual long term effect of consumption of small amounts of bleach? I haven't researched to find any studies, but it would seem likely that some have been done.

I used to help my parents prepare for their annual Winter Texan pilgrimage to Texas after my father retired. He cleaned the water containers with bleach. Even after I rinsed them repeatedly, I could still smell a bleach residue, but the more immediate response was that pouring out the bleach water caused the earthworms to immediately escape and come to the surface.

Granted that bleach is probably absorbed in a more concentrated area in soil than in air, where the odor could be dispersed, it was still unsettling to see how quickly the worms got out of the soil.