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        Prevent plants to grow behind shed? Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I am building a shed and have the foundation (paver) in photo attached. What to do to prevent plants from growing and crawling behind the shed in the dirt area between the foundation and the fence? Should I lay landscape fabric to cover it?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: quanghoc,

         
        Posts: 277 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        When my wife and I moved into our house (over 20 years ago now), there was lots of creeping ground cover that managed to grow up and under my garage shingle siding. I kept cutting it back, but it was a never ending battle. A couple of years ago, I basically went though a process similar to laying pavers. Along the edge of the garage, I put down brick. I dug a bed deep and wide enough for the brick, put in some sand and covered with a double layer of landscape cloth. I then laid the brick on top of that. It keeps that stuff from growing up the garage wall. You could do the same thing with stone instead of brick or, do you have any more of those pavers used for your shed foundation?
         
        Posts: 261 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        Cutting it back and landscape cloth is useless.
        Got to dig it out by the roots then spray total vegetation killer.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 17998 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        @SturdyNail: Yes I have plenty more of those pavers

        @Joe: I agree. I failed many times to manage and control those. Plants just don't die in Pacific Northwest!! Any vegetation killer you recommend?
         
        Posts: 277 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        Pramitols always worked for me.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 17998 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Conrad
        posted Hide Post
        We have used a soil sterilizer for areas where no growth of any plants are wanted. Works well for under a fencing line that you don't want to trim or cracks/joints in pavers, bricks or cement joints. Soil sterilizer not only kills vegetation, prevents seeds from sprouting, it works continually for 9 months (which is a total growing season here), till it finally is ineffective and you need to reapply it.
         
        Posts: 6864 | Location: Plains and Mountains | Registered: Sep 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I would cover the area with a thick plastic. Take a flat shovel and push it half way into the ground around the area you wish to cover. Lay the plastic, then take the flat shovel and push the plastic into the grove and tamp it tight.
        Pictures here are a PITA, so here's a link to give you and idea.

        http://www.alibaba.com/showroo...ic-ground-cover.html
         
        Posts: 733 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        How to build a cheap DIY pond or pool.
        Line the area with plastic Smile


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 17998 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Joe... Thanks for the laugh..
        I would hope he slopes the area away from the foundation, and being less then a foot wide.............
        quanghoc..
        But after thinking about it, and not knowing where you live..
        Here we have a code that the shed has to be a certain distance from the fence and property line.?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: ron45,
         
        Posts: 733 | Registered: Jan 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        It's the same in most places.
        Love it then even if it's there own fence they jam it up against the fence, then have no way to work on the fence or the shed.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 17998 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        I would not use plastic as a weed barrier unless it was used as solarization, which wouldn't be possible if it's underneath a shed.
         
        Posts: 1742 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Love it then even if it's there own fence they jam it up against the fence, then have no way to work on the fence or the shed.


        Now thinking about it: Doh! Maybe I have to build the foundation out a bit. At least I haven't started on the shed yet. It's the Rubbermaid one:

        http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/2...02525045&R=202525045
         
        Posts: 277 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of joecaption
        posted Hide Post
        Hope that works out for you.
        Seen to many of them blown apart in a wind storm or not have the doors work due to a poor flooring system.


        joecaption
         
        Posts: 17998 | Location: Hartfield VA | Registered: Jan 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by quanghoc:

        I am building a shed and have the foundation (paver) in photo attached. What to do to prevent plants from growing and crawling behind the shed in the dirt area between the foundation and the fence?



        Quanghoc, if I remember correctly from previous posts, you're in California, right? What's your earthquake hazard zone status?

        You didn't mention whether or not the pavers would be secured in any fashion to each other or to the shed, or how you prepared the soil underneath before laying them.

        I was wondering about the feasibility of a simple paver foundation in an earthquake state.

        I don't live in an active earthquake zone, but I can offer some experience on pavers over long term use: they can subside, move and crack, even without anything heavy being dropped on them. I have close to 300 in my garden, laid out as paths over which a lawn mower, garden cart with various light and heavy objects, and an old lady regularly traverse. The ones that crack aren't that many, but they can split and break up.

        I was wondering also if you need to build to certain specs given that you're in an earthquake state, and if those standards might affect your shed. Might want to check with your building department - it would be a shame to build a shed and have an earthquake move it for you!

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1742 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        @GardenSprite I am actually in Seattle so I don' think we worry much about earthquake or high wind here. Plus my area is like a jungle, full of trees. They block all the wind and sun.

        The biggest worry here is rain & water. Too much water I would say. So the ground tends to very soft most of the year. I had 5" deep of crushed concrete from a local place and then concrete sand filling between the pavers. Pretty standard installation I would say.

        But now with this thread's suggestion, I am making the area bigger so I don't have to put the shed too close to the fence. I thought on saving some space push it against the fence close but I guess it's not worth the trouble to save little space.
         
        Posts: 277 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        My apologies; for some reason I thought you were in California.

        I think you're making a wise decision to allow more space between the shed and the fence. I've tried to work with a shed that was installed too close to a house by a previous owner and caused a LOT of problems: inadequte ventilation, moisture and moss buildup, impossibility of maintenance of that side of the shed ... just to start.

        Good luck with your project!
         
        Posts: 1742 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I would think even if this were in earthquake territory a small shed could be built floating over the paver foundation.

        quanghoc,
        Are you planning on using the pavers as the floor or are you building a platform floor that will rest on the pavers?


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 621 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Are you planning on using the pavers as the floor or are you building a platform floor that will rest on the pavers?


        I am planning to build a platform on top of that paver. The paver is not even / flat so I have to use treated wood and plywood to make a platform. At least I can use shim on wood. What do you think?
         
        Posts: 277 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Since you won't be attaching this shed to the house the paver base if properly prepared should be a decent foundation for your shed. Even if you were in earthquake territory the shed would shift around as a unit in an earthquake. Again if in earthquake territory any electrical connection would need to be flexible. But you're not in earthquake territory so no worries.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 621 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Quanghoc, didn't you post sometime last year about a plant you found when visiting someplace in California? Maybe that's where I got the idea that you lived in California.

        Sorry to take the thread in this direction, but I just remember associating your name with California.
         
        Posts: 1742 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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