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            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Landscaping & Gardening    when to prune plum tree
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        when to prune plum tree Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I live in mild climate California. I have two plum trees in my front lawn. There are merely decorative, but (unfortunately) they do bear fruit.

        They are both old, one was planted over 6 years ago, the other was there when we bought the house.

        Last year one got aphids (I think it was last May) so I hired a tree company to spray both and in addition they pruned them, something I had never done or thought about.

        I would like to prune them myself this year. They are not that big. Is it okay to prune them every year? And when should I prune them.

        Keep in mind I am NOT pruning them to get more or bigger prunes. just to thin them out, remove low hanging branches, etc.
         
        Posts: 205 | Registered: Apr 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Seems like your question is timely. For California, you're apparently approaching pruning time.

        These might help:

        http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu.../Pruning_&_Training/

        http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu...Nuts/Plum_and_Prune/

        You might also watch for diseases and pests besides aphids. I had a nice fruit bearing plum tree that I lost to a fungal disease, but that same disease may not be an issue in California.

        These also may help in keeping your plums attractive and disease free:

        http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu...Nuts/Plum_and_Prune/

        http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu...re/Pests_&_Diseases/

        Hope this helps.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Not an arborist, but just how many times will you ever get to type that noun? So I had to post a reply.
        On ASTOH Roger does trimming when the trees are dormant and bare of leaves, because you get a full picture of the outline you are working with. And what you will end up with.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1535 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks to both of you....I did try looking up the info...googling it...but the sites seemed to focus on pruning in relation to getting more fruit.
         
        Posts: 205 | Registered: Apr 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        I imagine that typically pruning is done to enhance the harvest rather than the appearance, so unless you could find information on pruning ornamentals, the kind of references posted might be what you'll typically find. There are some ornamental trees which produce nonedible fruit, but offhand I can't remember which ones they are. I'll check my garden catalogues and see if I can find some (that'll give me an excuse to daydream about gardening anyway!)

        However, if you're not interested in fruit, I think you could prune them however you want, just being careful not to take off too many branches but rather to keep the tree in an attractive shape.

        If there are any dead shoots or branches, those would obviously be the first to go. I'm not that familiar with fruit tree cycles in California, so I don't know if the trees would be bare now. If so, you could study the tree from different angles before you prune.

        Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        We have a couple of crabapple trees that fit that description. The birds harvest those apples{?} and have hit up the trees with the recent snowfalls.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1535 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Crabapples - that's what I was trying to think of but just keep thinking of choke cherries.
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        in central florida, which has about the same climate as in California, we prune any time we want, except for trees and bushes that flower on old growth. If you're not pruning for either fruit or flowers, then I believe pruning whenever it's convenient for you will work. As G.Sprite advises prune the dead wood and thos branches that detract from the trees appearance
         
        Posts: 2575 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Corinne, I found general pruning info info that might be of help.

        These articles on

        Maintenance Pruning

        Pruning a Mt. Fuji cherry tree

        and

        Where to Cut

        might be of help in providing general information that you can adapt to your tree.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1929 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by GardenSprite:
        Crabapples - that's what I was trying to think of but just keep thinking of choke cherries.


        Actually they were gifts presented to us a ways back. Being treehuggers they were well received. But not sure if I would ever plant another. Mainly because just to many other types of natives well want to try as well.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1535 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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