DIY Message Boards
Most Durable Construction Material?

This topic can be found at:
http://boards.diynetwork.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/6221916776/m/1013916177

Jun 25, 2013, 09:40 AM
Landisil
Most Durable Construction Material?
I recently inherited several acres of land in the South. I am beginning the planning phase to build a house. I have a large extended family with construction experience. My question is what is the most durable and least problematic exterior building material... i.e. Block, Concrete, Wood,...experiences, ideas, opinions are welcome.


Thank You
Jun 25, 2013, 10:00 AM
redoverfarm
Hardee concrete board for exterior is less maintenance, bug proof and probably will last longer than any other material.
Jun 25, 2013, 01:29 PM
swschrad
dense natural stone is as durable as it comes. why, they made mountains of the stuff that are still standing today!

metal roofing and concrete siding are probably the longest-lived exterior materials today that will get nung on a house frame.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Jun 25, 2013, 05:26 PM
Sparky617
I would look at insulated concrete forms as a very durable construction method. Cover this with stucco, Hardi-plank or panel or other fiber cement board, or brick or stone.

I'd personally avoid vinyl siding. Hardi will require painting at some point. For trim I'd used cellular PVC and Hardi-trim. For windows I'd go with a high quality vinyl or aluminum clad window. For entry doors fiberglass.

A few miles from my house a guy built an insulated concrete form house with a tile roof and covered it in stucco. Very nice house, though it doesn't fit in this area. It would definitely be more at home 100 miles to the east near the coast.

Structural foam panels are another interesting way of building a home.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Jun 26, 2013, 06:03 PM
Landisil
Thank you all for your input. I am considering using forms and pouring concrete to form the walls.... any opinions regarding the draw backs with this type of building method....ideas.. regarding relative const...durability and other issues? If this methodolgy seems problematic...what would be preferable given a humid and warmer climate. Also any resources, links and such data would be welcome.


Thank you
Jun 27, 2013, 09:03 AM
Sparky617
Cardboard could be a durable building material if it were protected from water. I suspect that in residential construction a poured concrete wall for above grade walls would be cost prohibitive. It is a common building technique for commercial and industrial buildings, though the walls are typically poured with the the forms on the ground and the walls tipped up into place.

I suggest you try searching with Google.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulating_concrete_form
http://www.concreteconstructio...e-concrete-home.aspx


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Jun 27, 2013, 02:56 PM
swschrad
while tip-up walls are point-solid, the framing that generally holds them is not up to the side load of strong line winds and tornadoes. there is discussion in tornado alley type locations that tip-ups should be banned because when the roof fails, the rest falls in.

from very limited exposure to the technique from the inside on a mechanical room atop the surgical suite in a hospital and side walls in a business campus, as well as being along the edges in "orange aprion" stores looking for concrete stuff, the only difference I can see in that construction of a tip-up and a metal butler bulding is the outer walls are formed concrete with wires in it. and that looked a little, ahhh, shaky to me.

I am not a mechanical or structural engineer, and they don't talk to me on the street, so your calculations may be different than my sideways glance.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?