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Nicole Curtis-rehab addict...is terrific!!

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Feb 21, 2013, 01:51 PM
swschrad
Nicole Curtis-rehab addict...is terrific!!
the heavy buying sponsors vary. within the past two years, the orange aprons have given way to blue aprons on just about all the shows. we midwesterners have not seen any of the green aprons that periodically showed up when programs were given free rein to grab and go at the 'Nard, and OSH is totally off the giveaway list right now.

suffice it to say, the high-buck stuff given on the shows comes direct from manufacturers or their reps, and you should find the basics in just about any lumberyard or home center.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Feb 21, 2013, 05:32 PM
Sparky617
quote:
Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
At least Hometime takes the time to explain the jobs and trade performed and why they are important to the building process. I can do without the trips to HD with the host telling the finer points to a putty knife purchase. But that is just me. The man does have to pay the bills.

The local PBS runs its member fund raising with those silly specials as well. But at least the will run a mini marathon of say four shows of TOH that did not run at its proper time slot. Big Grin



I liked Hometime and met Dean and one of his many wives at the Home Show in Raleigh about 15 years ago. I think it was Robin, but I could be wrong. He's been "married" so many times I can't keep track of them all. It was run commercially here for a while but no more. 500 channels on cable and I don't get Hometime anywhere. HGTV and DIY seem more interested in House Hunters, LIOLI, Income Property and the Crashers series. I still watch TOH but it too has changed over the years from being a DIY with help show to a product showcase or 22 minute infomercial for whatever product donations they got for this project. Still they do amazing projects.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Feb 21, 2013, 05:37 PM
Sparky617
The of course there is always "This Old Shack"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbgOePab-b0


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Feb 23, 2013, 07:44 AM
CommonwealthSparky
Anybody remember the overbearing Bob Villa ? Steve Thomas was a likeable guy, not sure why he left, or was pushed... Kevin is far away the best thing to happen in a long time. Not that the trademen are not top notch, as they are. Big Grin I always learn something new with the tech approach to HVAC by Rich T.
Yes TOH does product presentation but at least they detail the how & whys of each application. Nothing worse that a DIY show that should actually be titled "Well this is what someone installed here and it looks great". Eek


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 23, 2013, 09:38 AM
Sparky617
Spark,
I've been watching ToH from the very start. Somewhere I have the companion book from the first house.

Steve wanted to move on to do other things and wound up back in the same type of show on HGTV or DIY for a while. Kevin does a good job with the format. HGTV and DIY owe their existence to This Old House and Home Time. They were the first and are still the best. PBS used to run another show that was much more hands on, I think it was call Old House Journal or something like that. The host was very hands on and they showed how to restore elements of old homes. Very laid back and informative and rarely did he resort to a sledgehammer.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Feb 23, 2013, 11:12 AM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
Anybody remember the overbearing Bob Villa ?


"Overbearing" is an accurate description of him. I would add condescending and arrogant. But if I remember, he was the first "host" when TOH was a new show and if I remember a new concept. Perhaps his attitude was one of the reasons that the succeeding hosts were more personable; the producers may have wanted someone who could relate more to the then DIYers.

As I remember, Vila began hawking products for Sears, or doing Sears advertisements. I recall he was doing something that promoted his own interests and presumably being paid for doing so. I suspect the producers of TOH saw a conflict of interest.

The one person on the current TOH who I find irritating is Roger, the landscape guy. He doesn't seem to have the same cost saving approach as does Tom (?), the general contractor.

Norm Abrams, though is my all time favorite for his informative and very helpful if not complicated woodworking projects. Roy Underhill is right up there when it comes to complication, doing ALL of his woodworking by hand and never using electrically powered tools.

Abrams was thorough, safe, cautious, and creative. I taped many of his New Yankee Workshop episodes and am glad I did since PBS in this area no longer carries that program.

And by the way, Vila is now a retread back on RLTV (Retirement Living TV) channel, with the same know-it-all attitude.

As to HGTV, it once was a very useful channel but now has become repetitive with canned, predictable and uninformative programs. It seems to me another example of "dumbing down" tv programs, in the same category as the ones on hoarding, wife swapping, alligator grabbing, that nauseous revolting "Dog" bounty hunter character, and other programs which appeal to a very specific and sometimes reactionary audience.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
Feb 23, 2013, 04:14 PM
Jaybee
Really kind of a moot point. Show hosts are there to host and while their personality does influence how the show turns out, they have nothing to do with the planning of the project, how it gets done, the materials used or even the homeowners.


Jaybee
Feb 24, 2013, 07:42 AM
CommonwealthSparky
As much as I admire Norms skill and TV personality {both top shelf} I could never warm up to NYW. Pushing oak 1by through a table saw and the resulting perfect cuts became stale quickly in my world. I never had or will have a shop equal or close to the TV setup, either. Not that you really need it, but machines help. Big Grin
TOH reruns had a life on HGTV or DIY a ways back, but no longer. NYW never made it that far and the owners of the shows are sitting on a vast library. Methinks it has something to do with downloads and that iTune thingy on that world wide web wachchama callit. Wink


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 24, 2013, 10:25 AM
Jaybee
quote:
Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
As much as I admire Norms skill and TV personality {both top shelf} I could never warm up to NYW. Pushing oak 1by through a table saw and the resulting perfect cuts became stale quickly in my world. I never had or will have a shop equal or close to the TV setup, either. Not that you really need it, but machines help. Big Grin


That's why you don't see this type of how-to show anymore. TV is an ever changing medium. As such it HAS to come up with something new or viewers loose interest. Can be a blessing and a curse at the same time. Most of the funny, quirky, & perky hosts are great to add interest to a how-to show but very few actually know much about construction, they are actors playing a part. By being professional actors, they can represent the show in the best way possible. On the flip side, you wouldn't want to see a construction pro like myself hosting a how-to TV show. Talk about a yawner!


Jaybee
Feb 24, 2013, 10:47 AM
Sparky617
Norms tool selection was well beyond what the typical home cabinetmaker would have. "Now I'll turn to my 3 foot wide belt sander to smooth the top"

I have a 1000 square feet of basement and no way could I have all of the tools he has in the NYW. That and the $100,000 budget he used to put it all together. That was what was cool about Roy Underhill and the Woodwright's Shop. He did it all without power and a lot of very simple tools as it was done 200 years ago.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Feb 27, 2013, 08:57 AM
CommonwealthSparky
I saw Nicole did a lead paint test on a recent episode. She dabbed a do-it-yourself kit on a bedroom wall, in a closet I believe. And than she proclaimed the 90 year old house to be totally lead free. Only in the world of television could that happen. {Unless the house was totally gutted after the lead paint banning became official.} But even that date is sketchy {pre 1978} as manufactures, wholesalers and stores were allowed to move all stock produced before that date.
Most lead testing I have been around test areas that children can access, as in window sills and aprons, door casing. Anything below a certain height is paramount. And in every room where work will occur.
But at best Nicole did mention the lead problem that could be present.


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 27, 2013, 09:16 PM
Jaybee
The only "good" part of the RRP laws (yeah, I actually used the words "good" and "RRP" in the same sentence!) is that lead testing only needs to be done in the areas that will be disturbed by a remodel. There are some silly and meaningless square footage rules (6Ft interior and 20 Ft exterior) that really don't exempt anything, but the basics are that if lead is not in the area disturbed then you are OK.

Nice that they did show lead testing but of course lead testing was done months before so the result was already known. As I mentioned before had they shown a positive test the only option would be to shut down the TV show and move on.


Jaybee
Feb 28, 2013, 08:24 AM
CommonwealthSparky
Very valid points. Most if not all lead requirements are pointless. But tell that to a guy depending on that paycheck in DC writing the rules in regards to lead concerns. Or a parent that has a child living with the effects of lead poisoning.


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 28, 2013, 09:23 AM
Jaybee
I have no doubt that the intent was well meaning but the method fails on all counts. If the lead paint law logic was applied to driving laws then we would have this as an equivalent:

We all know that left turns are dangerous and cause many accidents. Therefore, cars can now only make a series of right turns. If you need to turn left, you must now make 3 rights. These rules will apply to all licensed drivers however, if an unlicensed driver makes a left-hand turn and causes an accident then any licensed driver who ever drove on that section of road will be liable for any damages and injurys. And just for fun your fine will be $32,500 per day for every day since you started driving.

I know this may sound silly, but it's actually a very accurate comparison of how stupid the RRP laws are.


Jaybee
Feb 28, 2013, 12:08 PM
GardenSprite
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jaybee:
The only "good" part of the RRP laws (yeah, I actually used the words "good" and "RRP" in the same sentence!) is that lead testing only needs to be done in the areas that will be disturbed by a remodel. ...

QUOTE]

Some years ago I contacted a lead abatement contractor; I'm pretty sure it was from an EPA list because that would be the only source I'd check before undertaking something as expensive as lead abatement.

This guy told me that there were different levels of lead testing, three I think but this was years ago. At the time I had peeling paint from ice dams and wanted to test it before fixing the mess.

This was years ago so I don't remember everything he said, but I do recall vaguely that I was told some kind of device could be used on the walls to determine the lead content without taking a sample.

That level of testing, however, would also "require" testing of the soil around outbuildings, in this case, a detached garage. He said that the different levels of testing were coupled with different levels of abatement.

So if the paint on the walls and/or ceiling tested positive through the so-called device scanning, I would have to undertake abatement for the garage, to which I planned no change.

This made no sense to me as I wasn't doing anything with the garage.

I felt I was being "played" and that this guy thought he could put one over on me.

Needless to say, he didn't get anything from me.
Feb 28, 2013, 12:31 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by Sparky617:

Norms tool selection was well beyond what the typical home cabinetmaker would have. "Now I'll turn to my 3 foot wide belt sander to smooth the top"



Sparky, thanks for the laugh. That is one aspect about Norm's advice that's difficult to follow - most people would never have all the tools he uses and would have to improvise, which isn't something Norm includes in his instructions.

My father has a woodworking shed of over 400 square feet and it's filled with all sorts of equipment, but like you he doesn't have, nor does he want or need, the array of tools Norm has.

But the difference is that Norm does this for a living and can expense and depreciate his substantial tool investment. I'm not sure if you're a contractor or a very skilled DIY'er and if you can expense your tools, but even still, it's a substantial out-of-pocket investment.

I have tremendous respect and admiration for Roy Underhill, especially since there's so much obsession today with electronic gadgets that do most everything for people (I think knowing how to read a map is going to become a lost art eventually). Roy is a reflection that our lives don't have to depend so heavily on electrical things to be creative.


As an aside, there's an interesting issue developing in a neighboring city which has replaced its parking meters with electronic devices. It's been the subject of local newscasts which include businesspeople who are complaining that it's causing them to lose customers, apparently because of long queue lines to input the data and arrange for payment (instead of just inserting coins).

Apparently, about 100 US cities have adopted this program, known as Parkmobile. It allows coinless people to park by calling a certain number, or by downloading a Smartphone app, which has to be launched, input with information from the meter and data on payment method. And this only costs $.35.

According to the newscasts, this program isn't very popular at all, and is very inconvenient, obviously requiring more time to use a mobile app than just take out change, put it in the slot and turn it. In addition, parkers have to queue to use the station as individual meters aren't fitted out with the software. So they stand in line to pay to park, wasting time.

Apparently the $.35 fee to use the mobile app goes to the city, helping it to increase its revenues. No mention was made of the cost of installation of all these electronic meters. Nor was any mention made of the power source of the queue stations, and the impact on the city's carbon footprint from this change.
Feb 28, 2013, 09:28 PM
swschrad
Moneyapolis has a different e-meter system, sorta like the pay box on a demo pad deal, except you walk over to the pay box, enter your meter number, and slide in your credit card.

as for Nicole... there are a ton of local interviews if you google her... and the Tom Barnard Podcast #123 has an interview. in addition to Detroit and Minneapolis, she apparently has had rehabs going in Atlanta and Florida as well. Janie Rehabseed?


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Mar 16, 2013, 08:54 AM
CommonwealthSparky
Saw another episode {new one as well} and Nicole was still sporting tank tops. Good TV there. One wonders about workman's comp rates for the crew. Big Grin


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Mar 16, 2013, 12:00 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by CommonwealthSparky:
Saw another episode {new one as well} and Nicole was still sporting tank tops. Good TV there. One wonders about workman's comp rates for the crew. Big Grin


Maybe the crew works for free just for the "view"?? And the tank tops will definitely increase the component of male viewers. Roll Eyes
Mar 17, 2013, 07:58 AM
CommonwealthSparky
As George Constanza once said "When there is cleavage you are bond to look". Wink


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...