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Annoying Yardcore commercial!

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Apr 04, 2013, 06:41 PM
DIYdoer63
Annoying Yardcore commercial!
The commercial is so annoying and is played all the time! The beginning part where he says, "Time is, time is, time is, time is...." over and over makes one want to turn the channel every time it plays! Please scrap current version... PLEASE!!
Apr 05, 2013, 08:55 AM
Sparky617
quote:
Originally posted by DIYdoer63:
The commercial is so annoying and is played all the time! The beginning part where he says, "Time is, time is, time is, time is...." over and over makes one want to turn the channel every time it plays! Please scrap current version... PLEASE!!


Get a DVR and record your favorite shows, then you can zoom through the commercials. Works like a charm.


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Apr 05, 2013, 11:47 AM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by DIYdoer63:
The commercial is so annoying and is played all the time! The beginning part where he says, "Time is, time is, time is, time is...." over and over makes one want to turn the channel every time it plays! Please scrap current version... PLEASE!!


This Board isn't monitored by people in charge of production or commercials, so they won't get your message.

The producers probably have a contract for that commercial and aren't going to scrap it because a viewer doesn't like it.

Use the commercials as an opportunity to channel surf, get some quick chores done, or find something else to watch.
Apr 05, 2013, 01:23 PM
swschrad
uh, it's not a commercial from an external paying sponsor... it's a promo for a DIY program, unpaid but the proof is in the Neilsen subscriber report.

the two episodes I've seen, frankly, they move somebody else's junkyard into this back yard in question, but if it was sticking up, it's now lying down, and vice versa. I like some of the features they built, and others... well, the money went into production crews and catering, not yard elements.

interesting premise, but the whole thing seems rushed, like Turf Wars without any responsible grown-ups in charge of the plans.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Apr 05, 2013, 04:05 PM
GardenSprite
Seems I've been "assuming facts not in evidence" as the legal eagles would say. Not having seen the program or commercial, I just assumed it was a paying sponsor.

I'm missing the point of moving junk from one yard to another. Is the purpose to be a temporary move while the first yard is cleaned up and/or built up to accommodate the junk, which presumably is eventually moved back from the second yard staging area?

Sounds like a lot of work just for junk. I sure wouldn't want to own the second yard!

Thanks for the clarification. Guess you can tell I don't watch the DIY channel much. I still prefer This Old House.
Apr 05, 2013, 06:30 PM
swschrad
it is assumed that taking old pallets, mounting them to treated posts as fence basketweave, and then threading in old rusted steel sheets that have been chemicall aged... is cutting-edge outside design.

sounds more like an abandoned farm building from the 30s to me.

that was the first show I saw.

the second, they put up a stucco wave wall, an S shape, to cut the yard in half. on one side, they had a nice patio arrangement. but a white stucco S? we make 'em a mile long in Fargo or New Orleans and call 'em flood walls.

more "creature" then "feature" to me. oh, and The Lighting Geek (tm) showed up to drill holes in jar lids for lights (OK) without putting in grommets to protect the wires, so they cut through in the first storm (not OK.) good idea, short-lived execution.

I guess grass, shrubs, water features, and fireside dining aren't enough any more....


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Apr 07, 2013, 06:10 PM
GardenSprite
I've never found the "abandoned farm" style of landscaping attractive either. The stucco wall style might have been attractive if it had been on a property border (especially with built-inpockets for hanging plants), but I can think of more attractive, less invasive, permanent and expensive ways of dividing a yard. But then, who am I to criticize the experts? Roll Eyes

This "style" of landscaping is exactly the opposite of some of the over-the-top features shown in programs prior to the recession, when backyard miniature Niagara Falls were created, massive pools with ornate designs were installed, and plants were purchased en masse from garden centers as opposed to old fashioned cutting methods from existing plants or growing them from seed.

I'm not sure if it was the recession that contributed to the change in style, or if junk yard landscaping is the trend now (like distressed furniture once was), but I've noticed a downgrade in quality of so many different tv programs.

A&E, Bravo, HGTV and some others actually used to have good quality programs. The top notch gardening programs disappeared from HGTV's lineup years ago, apparently in favor of predictable House Hunters programs with literally canned comments, and other similar home/house/real estate programs. I do understand the appeal of these types of programs during the real estate boom period, but that period has long since become past tense.

I've wondered if these changes are reflective of some movement which also has contributed to producers focusing on unpleasant and intensely personal subjects and delving deeply into people's personal problems, such as hoarding, OCD, marital and family dysfunctions, as well as the ultraright, conservative, male dominated, dissent suppressing religious sects. I'll also never understand the audience appeal of a family with enough kids to field 2 baseball teams.

As a former TV pro, perhaps you have some insight into this trend toward these kinds of programs?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
Apr 08, 2013, 06:45 PM
swschrad
look around the other cable channels, you see dysfunction in spades and doubled. if the highlight of your week is "Swamp People" and "Iyama, fix my Life" then you are not looking for high-end surroundings.

as if the vendors were handing them out as readily to program producers in the first place. their "gimme" budget is cut like everybody else's, so there is not as much tradeout stuff to account for in production.

and really, with the host and crew in there for only 24 hours, how much can you install? it's more often 1 or 2 days to rebuild a room/yard/life on TV now instead of 3 days.

it all adds up to "drive around, look for stuff that ain't nailed down, bring it back" TV at its finest.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Apr 16, 2013, 05:42 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by swschrad:
look around the other cable channels, you see dysfunction in spades and doubled.


That's my whole point. It's widespread.

One of my lit profs told us that Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in part addressed fear of what the Industrial Age and technology could bring.

During the Cold War and even recently, science fiction movies incorporated mutated, radiated monsters to threaten the world.

Now sci fi movies deal with climate change, including global warming and cooling. A few channels (including documentary ones) even air programs dealing with the end of civilization as we know it.

Although these types of movies and documentaries aren't necessarily bellwhethers of concerns for all societies, they are legitimate fears.

The issue I'm pondering is why dysfunction is such a popular tv topic. I recognize that overall it's beyond the scope of this forum, but I think that some of the DIY programs (such as junk yard landscaping) reflect something other than wholesome adjustment to life.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
Apr 16, 2013, 05:53 PM
swschrad
why do people choose dysfunction over control, clanging nonsense over peace, I have no idea. a wonderful series of PhD dissertations for mental health professionals, no doubt.

fortunately, this is generally not Style or Bravo channel.

might as well blame drugs and video games, everybody else does.

saw Yard Crashers last night, and another "hey, let's rust us up some sheet iron and weld a fence!" session was underway. whoever started this trend, please, somebody, send them overseas in some dead-end ambassadorship and let's take back thinking from the brain-dead.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Apr 16, 2013, 06:03 PM
GardenSprite
quote:
Originally posted by swschrad:

saw Yard Crashers last night, and another "hey, let's rust us up some sheet iron and weld a fence!" session was underway. whoever started this trend, please, somebody, send them overseas in some dead-end ambassadorship and let's take back thinking from the brain-dead.


Well, I suppose it's way to use up some extra sheet iron. Who knows? Someday it might be the trend of the future. Maybe archaeologists in 100 years will ponder the same questions we ask today when they find the junk yard landscaping Eek
Apr 17, 2013, 06:20 PM
swschrad
nice, new, flat sheet in this case. somebody out there is spreading the word that "this.... is cool. hip. urban. metro. the big thing for 2013. and Amalgamated Evil Chemical Company has just the thing to rust up all your metals. use it on TV, it's not $99.95... it's not $49.95... no, it's yours FREE! just fill out the continuity form and Jamie, here, will send ya some posthaste."

inspector will come around when the neighbors call and tag you for a public nuisance. cost you a couple grand to pull the junk out and haul it to the scrapyard.

next time, just plant old Cadillacs or Edsels in the ground and charge admission.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?