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        How to install Octagon Box on existing structure for wall lighting? Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I need to install new wall lighting (the bar type). I already have a hole through drywall right next to the stud.

        I am planning to buy either of those:

        http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ste...bohnZ1z11eryZ1z11evg

        http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ste...bohnZ1z11eryZ1z11evg

        I am thinking maybe the V bracket type is better. But how to do mount the bracket into the stud? The hole is just small enough to put the box through and I have no access on the right side to screw or nail the bracket into the stud. I could try to do it at an angle but it doesn't feel right.

        If this is not the right product, what should I buy as octagon box for existing structure?
         
        Posts: 282 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        There are several ways to do this. In most cases, you would use what's called an 'old work box' - like this:

        http://www.lowes.com/pd_70983-...ork%2Bbox&facetInfo=

        These are plastic boxes that use tabs to hold onto the backside of drywall. They will work fine for your wall light.

        You may also be able to use the second of your choices (SKU # 321532) since your location is right next to a stud. If your bar light has a large base, then all you need to do is to cut out for the box plus cut out a small tab of drywall on top of the stud next to the hole. Then you can screw the metal mounting tab directly into the stud while letting the fixture base cover the extra notch in the drywall.

        It's also possible to make the octagon hole just slightly larger than the box and install the box at a slight angle so that the mounting tab fits between the front face of the stud and the back side of the drywall. You can then screw through the drywall to hold the mounting tab in place. Here too there will be those screw holes to cover up if your fixture has a smaller base.

        I'd just go with the plastic old work box, it will do the job with an easy install. If you feel it needs more strength, you can drive a screw from the inside of the box into the stud next to it.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10477 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        My light bar has 3 lights, not too heavy but I would guess it's around 10-15 lbs.

        Look like that box holds up to 11 lbs. Maybe I have to weight my light which is this:
        http://www.lampsplus.com/produ...om-light__2t703.html
         
        Posts: 282 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        The old work oct box Jaybee posted would work fine if you also tie the base of you bar into the drywall with a toggle bolt on each side of the old work box. Most bar fixtures have holes for wall attachment using screws and plastic anchors. Use those holes or drill your own. Completely acceptable with all those NEC rules.
        I do use those old work boxes and they work well in most cases. But a box with metal ears instead of those plastic ears would be ideal. I do know that type of box is on the market, just not as common.
        Maybe a clerk at the Big Box you shop has them in stock and can help you out.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1576 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Yeah the light bar I have has only 2 screw mount in the center of it. It's just the design. So I have to mount into the box itself. Let me find out the weight of it. If it's around 10lbs or less, it should be OK
         
        Posts: 282 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        one little trick to keep the old-work boxes from pulling out is to slip sheet aluminum strips in the hole for the box, hold them tight, and use drywall screws to anchor the strips to the drywall over a larger space between studs than a screw's width. spread the load, increase the strength of the wall section. patching needed is minor, basically covering the drywall screws, prime and paint.

        I was able to use some thin wood in the garage for a single-gang old-work box in some cheesey old drywall, but it was barely thin enough. some sheet metal should be just marvelous.

        otherwise, of course, you can always open up the wall, and use a standard new-work box into the stud, or use a ceiling fan box to hold more weight and have the ability to position it more accurately. afterwards you have to patch the hole, prime and paint.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Again, since you say this box will be installed right next to the stud. Put in one or two drywall screws from the inside of the box into the stud. It will easily hold a 15 lb light then.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10477 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        See that all the time. But installing a box with drywall screws is actually a NEC violation. As in the sharp edge of drywall screw can nick a wire. But like I said see it all the time. Just pointing this out if it were to be inspected.
        We set our 4x4 boxes with sheet metal screws that have washers part of the screw head to pass inspections. Some very picky inspectors, that is for sure.

        Arlington Industries make an old work box with attachment screws that are recessed into the box housing. This results in no nicked wire and is NEC compliant.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1576 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        ahh, but I install the drywall backers with drywall screws, sparky, not the box. got to keep the scratchies down.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        My point was that mechanically fastening metal boxes with drywall screws can be red flagged by inspectors. If those screws are inside the box, that is. Sorry about my description of my point to make.
        This would not apply to an old work box that has the attachment holes moulded into the plastic on the flange outside the box itself. Or of course those 2 1/2" metal gang boxes attached to lathe with those small wood screws, as in the last eighty years. Those as well have attachment brackets outside the box.

        On the Arlington Industries website they list a code compliant old work box with inside attachment screws. And the NEC code that applies.
        As in their Steel-One Box. fan box

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1576 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        UPDATE 2/5/14: I installed the old work box and it worked perfectly. The light is only 8 lbs so it was holding up just fine.
         
        Posts: 282 | Location: United States | Registered: Dec 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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