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        Washer (Laundry) Receptacle Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I am re-working the electrical outlets in my basement and wanted to clean up the area by combining two receptacles at my washer. Here is my situation.

        1. Dryer-dedicated 240 - 30 amp breaker – I will leave this alone.
        2. Washer receptacle with a separate 20 AMP breaker. The previous owner has this circuit spliced and with single receptacle located about 5 feet from the washer and then the washer outlet.
        3. Then next to the washer receptacle was another receptacle that was feed from a different 15 amp breaker.

        The 15 amp receptacle is already on a circuit that is overloaded and I do not need this outlet so I want to remove it. Then I will move the other 20 amp receptacle next to the washer, so that an iron could be used.

        Per NEC code I have a dedicated circuit for the laundry (washer). My question is, can I install a 2-gang box for the 20 amp circuit and place two receptacles in it? One for the washer and one for the iron? I have read two sections of the code and I can interpret them either way.

        Thanks!
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Jan 13, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Since you already have an outlet for the washer plus a separate outlet for something else (iron?) then electrically there is no difference if you combined those two into one quad box. However, neither set-up gives you a dedicated line to the washer. Since both the washer and the iron are high amperage appliances, it is very possible that if used together they will overload the 20a circuit.

        A dedicated line means one circuit for one appliance use. You can't get around that by tapping in extra outlets, no matter where you put them.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10298 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        I would follow what Jaybee has posted in regards to your wiring needs in your laundry room. I too think that would work best.
        One addendum, as changes in the NEC 2014 "Laundry Room" is now the "Laundry Area". Small definition change but here is why its important. With that 2014 cycle change all 15a & 20a receptacles in the "Laundry Area" must be GFCI protected. This is meant to clear up questions as in many localities that required GFCI protection within 6'of the washing machine, but did not if the distance of any recepticle was greater than 6'. Now all receptacles are required to be protected.
        As we all know that the washing machine outlet itself has to be protected by a GFCI for years per the NEC. In these parts a single outlet was allowed instead of the GFCI. As in false trips caused by machine motors would trip a GFCI, but a single outlet supplying the machine and powering nothing else would be safe and keep the machine powered. The NEC feels that newer technology in GFCI design circuity has made false trips a thing of the past.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1433 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks!

        I will install a GFCI for the washer only and then use the other 15amp circuit to run a GFCI for the iron (which will be next to the washer). My next question is would a 2-gang box be enough for the 2 GGCI or should I use two separate boxes?
         
        Posts: 3 | Registered: Jan 13, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Separate them, I wouldn't install a double gang box and have two different breakers to shut it down. plus, since you'll have a 15 amp breaker, and a 20 amp breaker, you want to make sure the washer gets plugged into the right outlet, so maybe write "washer" on the correct plug cover (for the benefit of the you, workers, appliance repair people, future buyers of home)

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Re-mdlr,
         
        Posts: 949 | Location: No. California | Registered: Mar 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        I too would wire the devices as Re-mdlr posted. Depending on the location it is possible to always reach above the WM to power an appliance. Quite the pain for sure.
        But to throw a curve at you it is perfectly acceptable and NEC legal to wire both devices in a 2gang box.{Not that anyone said it was not}. Providing you perform a box fill calculation {including the GFCIs} and comparing that number to the cubic inches available by the box size being used on the possible set up. Box fill cals are not the most difficult thing going in the electrical world these days. But separating the two as Re-mdlr posted makes the most sense.
        Nor is it not a code violation for two supplies to feed one box. Just a possible awakening experience for the next guy working the box.
        Just thought I would post those what-ifs for reference material... Wink
        Good luck with your project.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1433 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I remember one double gang box I ran into, it took 4 circuit breakers to shut it down -- and I figured that out the easy way, no shocks, chirp, chirp, chirp,, chirp, chirp, chirp
         
        Posts: 949 | Location: No. California | Registered: Mar 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        I have run into odd setups but that takes the cake for sure. See a few 2 feed set ups dealing with lights which is odd considering how many fixtures you can safely place on a circuit.
        Still researching the dedicated circuit for a washing machine supply. My quick reference is not in the abode right now. I always place on a dedicated circuit be see many a one being shared with other outlets and seem to chug along fine.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1433 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        210.11{C}{2} Dedicated 20amp circuit required for laundry room outlets. Notice the plural. Hummm.
        Just nothing else allowed on that circuit, as in that rooms lights or outlets near but not in that room.
        Certainly can see the confusion that this could cause. That and bathroom specs cause many a heads scratch for sure.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1433 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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