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        Trying to install a hard wired oven Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I am trying to hook up a GE oven and its a hard wired set up with 4 wires. I figured out that the 2 black wires are positives and the grey wire is neutral and the bare wire is the ground.

        First issue is that the wires coming from the wall are very thick. So thick I can barely bend them thru the hole that holds the squeeze connector. I think I can do it in about an afternoon (2-3 hours).

        Second issue is its a "conduit" setup. Where I mean I have to push the wire ends thru holes and then tighten a screw to hold them in place. (except the ground wire which has the traditional wrap around screw setup.) The problem is that the wires are too thick to fit in the holes. Even the ground wire is huge and would take quite a bit of time to get it wrapped around the ground nut.

        Third issue is I think these wires maybe aluminum, but I do not know.


        So what I was hoping was that there may be some device I can buy at HD or lowes to attach to the wire ends to make them smaller and more manageable.

        Thanks for your time.
         
        Posts: 5 | Location: PA | Registered: Jun 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Is this a slide in oven into a cabinet, or a free standing 30 inch oven/cooktop combination? Have you read the installation instructions? There is a good possibility it is aluminum wires.

        I don't know of any devices you are looking for, but I've always found stove installs pretty straight forward.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Re-mdlr,


        They make it look so easy on tv, don't they
         
        Posts: 993 | Location: No. California | Registered: Mar 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        smaller wires make hotter fires. you don't want to go there.

        instead, install a range receptacle in a metal box (ground bonded) and a 4-wire range plug on the range.

        last range manual I read strongly discouraged hard wiring. and if you were going to do that, it would need to be in a flexible conduit.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Maybe you already know this but:

        1. The thick wires in the wall will terminate inside a bot either inside the wall or on the wall surface - usually recessed within the wall. The Hard wire from the stove to this box in the wall is a flexible, braided wire within a flexible conduit. This wire is joined to the house wires within the wall box.

        Also, most stoves do not have wires attached - they are designed to get a stove cord. This cord is wired to the stove at the contact points. On the house side, the house wires are run into the box and connected to a female outlet that matches the 4-pin stove cord.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10479 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I got home late from work today so I will look more closely tommorrow night. Its a free standing 30 inch stove. I was hoping to avoid installing a range receptacle box as I have never done that before.

        Was hoping just to put those wire ends on the end of the wires as the stove allows that kind of connection also.
         
        Posts: 5 | Location: PA | Registered: Jun 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Use a range receptacle box, and a matching oven pigtail size appropriately sized. The receptacle box will take your aluminum wires. The matching pigtail will make it easy to install and uninstall if repairs are needed. And don't forget the 'no tip over' bracket.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Re-mdlr,


        They make it look so easy on tv, don't they
         
        Posts: 993 | Location: No. California | Registered: Mar 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Best if you call a professional electrician to check out the possibility of having aluminum wiring present. Pigtailing aluminum and copper wire is a NEC violation without the properly rated connectors. And extremely dangerous. The OP has mentioned hard wiring the appliance which is a NEC violation in itself. A disconnect within eyesight is a must for future service calls. {That is why I mention this}. Your set up needs a properly sized box and outlet with the range having a proper plug in cord as well. I think your house wiring is actually old tinned copper wire, but just an internet guess. Can not see the setup from here. Wink
        Having someone qualified to inspect your present setup and make code compliant upgrades if needed is paramount. As in making sure the cable present if used has the wiring color code installed correctly. As in the blacks are the hot and the grey the neutral. Most likely is but nothing is absolute in the electrical world.
        Pigtails, whips and corded plugs are all different names for electrical components. What muddies the waters is regional differences in terminology. All on board are trying to convey the proper set up but it can become a task if unsure of the exact set up. Good luck with your project.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1579 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        just a note on aluminum wire. If it is aluminum, make sure you use an anti- corrosion compound at all connections
        It's not a bad idea to use it at all connections regardless of what the wire is made of

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: nona,
         
        Posts: 2584 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        the inspectapedia has lovely pictures of the approved Ideal al-cu connectors all melted out and short-tastic. do not directly connect aluminum and copper, it's a cheat. aluminum wire is point-to-point for safety. if it's too short, repull it.

        let a pro work on aluminum. our brief at the telco on that is that unless you have a gelled cable, you untwist the strands, scuff 'em with a Scotchbrite green soaked up with No-Ox, more goo, retwist, coat, and then ratchet down the spade lugs with the monster crimper. I haven't seen that elsewhere, but in my 18 years, we've only had one central office electrical fire. it's all high-current 48 volt battery in this world.

        aluminum is still approved for direct connect, but strongly discouraged. a licensed electrician will choose the correct aluminum-rated socket, prep it right, torgue it to the recommended pressure so expansion and contraction as the wire works and rests doesn't work it loose, and walk away leaving safe work.

        (( nona, one should never try terminating a wire that is not clean and bright, there will be oxide and future issues. with copper and clean surfaces that make a gas-tight connection when torqued, goo is not necessary. ))

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Are these Aluminum wires? My condo was built about 1990 and I read that they were still using aluminum wiring for 220 setups such as ovens and dryers.


        http://i59.tinypic.com/15wcvwi_th.jpg

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: John324,
         
        Posts: 5 | Location: PA | Registered: Jun 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        aluminum has to be one standard AWG wire gauge larger than copper. look at the wire ends. if they are silverish, it's aluminum. if they are reddish-yellow, they are copper.

        looked at the picture, that's aluminum.

        as I mentioned, code still allows aluminum for things like stoves and dryers, a direct connection circuit with no taps or other gizmos. it's a compromise because with aluminum, every connection, every tap, is a potential issue.

        call the man, get the receptacle and cord done. stove direct connects are not necessarily aluminum safe to start with, and nobody likes direct wiring to them.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks for all the input. I have a much better understanding of the situation now.

        But at the same time it seems as easy as, cutting down the wires to the appropriate size, attaching a aluminum rated receptacle to a stud, then attaching the aluminum wires to the receptacle. I need to pay an electrician $200 for that?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: John324,
         
        Posts: 5 | Location: PA | Registered: Jun 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I'm thinking the answer is 'yes'. It will give you safety and peace of mind. He or she will come out to your house (gas costs and time), have supplies, install them, put everything together, and you'll have it set up properly. Good idea.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Re-mdlr,


        They make it look so easy on tv, don't they
         
        Posts: 993 | Location: No. California | Registered: Mar 24, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Quick somewhat related question. I just bought a new ceiling fan and am in the process of installing it. The wires that came with the ceiling fan are very thin and threaded together. They are shiny silver. Are these aluminum wires? Its a Harbor Breeze fan from Lowes.
        http://www.lowes.com/pd_44687-...uctId=4165413&rpp=32

        thanks for your time
         
        Posts: 5 | Location: PA | Registered: Jun 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        No, they are likely tinned copper. Aluminum wire tends to be dull.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 890 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        nobody in their right mind will use aluminum wire in an appliance or fixture. not even the low-ballers on whichever island was above water for a couple hours two months ago.

        it's rather unusual to have the wire ends tinned, extra step, two or three more workers, so consider that a good omen.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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