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220 wiring

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http://boards.diynetwork.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/4691013504/m/4693944108

Feb 22, 2014, 03:57 PM
Groveman1
220 wiring
We purchased a new Kenyon 240 volt Electric grill for my lanai. We had a Jenn air electric grill that we are replacing. The Jennifer air was wired directly from wiring in the wall and was 240 volt. I did not unhook the old grill and don't know how it was wired. As I install a junction box under the cabinet, I notice that there are 4 wires coming from the wall, black, white, red and bare. The grill has flexible conduit with 3 wires, black, red and green. Any suggestions, or should I call an electrician before connecting in the junction box?
Feb 22, 2014, 04:54 PM
Jaybee
There should be instructions on your new grill - the white and the green will both tie together to the green on the grill.

Make sure that the amperage rating for the new grill is not higher than the old.


Jaybee
Feb 22, 2014, 05:39 PM
Groveman1
Hey, thanks. Everything checked out as far as specs for new grill vs. old. Since there is a black, red, white and bare from wall and black, red, and green from grill, I should connect black to black, red to red, white to green and bare to ground in box??
Thanks for the help!
Feb 23, 2014, 08:01 PM
swschrad
adding to Jaybee's post, if you cannot find a frame ground referenced in the new grill's wiring diagram, bare and white should be bonded to both the green of the grill and to the usual metal screw near that connection. the frame should never be left floating.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Feb 24, 2014, 07:31 AM
CommonwealthSparky
One important addendum is that a dedicated circuit needs a disconnect within a proper working distance of the range. Hard wiring say a dryer or range is a NEC violation. But installing a proper wall outlet and cord on the range will meet the requirement of that disconnect. This is a requirement that provide safe working conditions for future service work.
As it has not been actually part of the discussion I thought I would chime in. Hope all is proper. Wink

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CommonwealthSparky,


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 24, 2014, 11:33 AM
swschrad
being outside, a splashproof disconnect would be in order. the ones sold for air conditioner outside units are just dandy, and unfused sell for about $12 around here. since you have it breakered, that's all you need.

unless local code requires a GFI protected disconnect, which is closer to $60, usual application is hot tubs.

(lanai means balcony or patio on the mainland)

This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Feb 24, 2014, 08:09 PM
CommonwealthSparky
I was wondering about that lanai for sure. Big Grin


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Feb 25, 2014, 11:36 AM
swschrad
IMPHO lanais should have tropical plants blooming year round. so I can't have one back of my house, where the snow is burying the chips of eggshell the blue jays are wild about that we set on the drink rail.

sigh. where's global warming when I need it? (lows to 12 below Fahrenheit again this week)


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Feb 25, 2014, 08:03 PM
CommonwealthSparky
quote:
Originally posted by swschrad:
being outside, a splashproof disconnect would be in order. the ones sold for air conditioner outside units are just dandy, and unfused sell for about $12 around here. since you have it breakered, that's all you need.

unless local code requires a GFI protected disconnect, which is closer to $60, usual application is hot tubs.

(lanai means balcony or patio on the mainland)


True fact as you point out that a weatherproof disconnect would be required to be NEC compliant.


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...