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Venting question

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Apr 18, 2013, 01:08 AM
mikem201
Venting question
Hello,

I was told that one story slab foundations do not have waste stacks. What is the most common way to vent fixtures on a single story slab?
Apr 18, 2013, 08:04 AM
Jaybee
You use a waste stack vent, just like any other style of house. Whoever told you that info was incorrect.


Jaybee
Apr 18, 2013, 08:56 AM
mikem201
quote:
Originally posted by Jaybee:
You use a waste stack vent, just like any other style of house. Whoever told you that info was incorrect.


How if its a one story slab construction? Everything is piped in under the slab in different areas on that one floor.
Apr 18, 2013, 09:02 AM
Sparky617
quote:
How if its a one story slab construction? Everything is piped in under the slab in different areas on that one floor.


The same way in a house over a crawlspace or a basement or in the middle of a high rise building. The vent goes up, the waste goes down. The vent goes up from the waste line through the roof.

http://www.ask.com/wiki/Drain-...stem?o=2800&qsrc=999

http://home.howstuffworks.com/...umbing-basics-ga.htm


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Apr 18, 2013, 09:40 AM
mikem201
A basement or crawl space foundation different. There is path for the stack from the rooms above. On a slab there are no rooms above, thus, no waste stack.
Apr 18, 2013, 09:48 AM
Re-mdlr
Under the slab, you have a main drain line -- and it has branches coming into it from the different fixtures and area of the house. And by the fixtures you have pipes that go up in the walls and through the roof and stick out thru the roof to "vent" the system. If some of those vents are near each other, they can be inter connected to reduce the number of roof penetrations.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Re-mdlr,
Apr 18, 2013, 09:53 AM
mikem201
right im talking about the waste stack not the vent stack. My point is in a one story slab there is no Waste stack.
Apr 18, 2013, 09:59 AM
Re-mdlr
quote:
Originally posted by mikem201:
Hello,

What is the most common way to vent fixtures on a single story slab?

Apr 18, 2013, 10:04 AM
mikem201
Would you preferably have a separate vent stack and have other fixtures tie into that before exiting the roof?
Apr 18, 2013, 10:47 AM
nona
I have lived in 4 1 story homes in the past 50 + years, each one of them had/has a vent stack for the kitchen and bathrooms. Contrary to the belief that florida is all built over, they are still building 1 story homes here and each one has vent stacks (good thing though, or else the whole state would smell from sewage )
Apr 18, 2013, 02:11 PM
mikem201
is it built on a slab?
Apr 18, 2013, 03:09 PM
Sparky617
Follow the links I posted they explain how the system works. Slab, crawlspace or basement makes no difference your waste system needs to vent to properly function.

By your definition are you calling the "waste stack" the waste line coming down from the second floor of a two story house? In your 1 story slab house there would be vents going up from the fixtures, these could be joined together in the attic to limit the penetrations through the roof.

I'm not a plumber, don't play one on TV but I do have a pretty good understanding of how the system works. There are one way valves that can be put on island sinks and other places you can't get a vent line to run, however I believe you still need an external vent stack for the toilets to function properly.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Apr 18, 2013, 05:34 PM
swschrad
here, from an old-time master plumber I worked with once, is all you really need to know about plumbing...

water goes up

(!) goes down

and the gas goes out the roof.

if these rules are met and nothing puddles on the floor, it's plumbing. anything else is a mess. code exists to make sure the three rules are met.


sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
Apr 18, 2013, 07:01 PM
mikem201
quote:
Originally posted by Sparky617:
Follow the links I posted they explain how the system works. Slab, crawlspace or basement makes no difference your waste system needs to vent to properly function.

By your definition are you calling the "waste stack"



the waste line coming down from the second floor of a two story house? In your 1 story slab house there would be vents going up from the fixtures, these could be joined together in the attic to limit the penetrations through the roof.

I'm not a plumber, don't play one on TV but I do have a pretty good understanding of how the system works. There are one way valves that can be put on island sinks and other places you can't get a vent line to run, however I believe you still need an external vent stack for the toilets to function properly.


Yes I know there will be a vent stack even on a one story slab. My statement was that there will be no waste stack on a one story slab.
Apr 18, 2013, 07:52 PM
Sparky617
Mike,
It looks to me like your first post was asking about venting and waste stack. If you're going to come here for advice, it would be good not to argue with people who are offering you advice for no cost to you. If you don't have fixtures higher than 3 feet off the floor (kitchen and bathroom sinks) you wouldn't need a waste stack to the second floor you don't have. But you will need a vent stack. In this diagram from one of the links I provided in my answer you kind see that the vent and soil stack are one in the same. In a house with one wet wall, kitchen and bathrooms all on the same wall it might be a single pipe. In larger homes with multiple bathrooms you will likely have a much more spread out system and could quite possibly have multiple vents going through the roof and several underfloor lines coming together into one soil stack to the septic tank or public sewer.

quote:
Originally posted by mikem201:
Hello,

I was told that one story slab foundations do not have waste stacks. What is the most common way to vent fixtures on a single story slab?




General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
Apr 27, 2013, 01:58 AM
Frodo
the most common way to vent a fixture ona single story house is a common vent.
a waste stack is a pipe that carries waste in it. you will not havev a waste stack in a single story house
all you will have is vent stacks
let me break it down
the main sewer line coming into the building from the street is called a building drain
then it will turn up with a 90 degree fitting

at this junction its called a waste line
above the 90 [if its a toilet] there will be a tee
the outlet of the tee is called a waste arm or closet arm
the top of the tee is a vent. it will proceed up the the roof and terminate about 12 inch above the shingles
on the waste line/building drain before the 90 for the toilet is installed a combo y and 1/8 bend also called a combo. it will have a branch [usually 2"]
that will turn up [with a 90] behind your lavitory sink, above the floor at about 19" will be a tee
the outlet has the sink draining into it and the top of it is the vent
it can terminate out the roof or it can tie into the vent that we installed for the toilet
the vent we installed for the toilet is a common vent. but.when you tie another vent into it it is called a vent stack
clear now.. now that you know what to call it
whats yourquestion

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Frodo,


https://www.youtube.com/*****?v=vn7bkncf1_E
Apr 27, 2013, 07:31 AM
CommonwealthSparky
quote:
Originally posted by nona:
I have lived in 4 1 story homes in the past 50 + years, each one of them had/has a vent stack for the kitchen and bathrooms. Contrary to the belief that florida is all built over, they are still building 1 story homes here and each one has vent stacks (good thing though, or else the whole state would smell from sewage )

Best post ever !!!!! Big Grin


Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
Apr 27, 2013, 07:54 AM
Frodo
a after thought...what is a vent? why a vent?

put a straw in a glass of water,
put your thumb over the hole and pick the straw up
the straw remains full of water
no vent
take your thumb off the hole, it drains
vent
to ck a toilet for correct venting
put saran wrap over the bowl, flush toilet
if saran wrap " pumps" up an down bad vent


https://www.youtube.com/*****?v=vn7bkncf1_E