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        Venting a washer in older home Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I am relocating my washer and dryer to the first floor os my century old home. I need to vent the drain but doing so would imply running a 1 1/2" pipe in an external wall throught two floors and the attic. The location of the washer would make that task quite complicated and costly. The option is to run the pipe inside the rooms but that would not be my ideal choice.

        I have heard of an "in wall" venting system that consists of a pipe with an air filter cap that allows the air to come in but not to come out. I have not been able to find the product online. Can anyone advise me on such a product and installation.

        A friend of mine said he has briefly seen that product on a home show on dyi channel.
         
        Posts: 1 | Location: Fredericton, New Brunswick | Registered: Sep 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I believe this is what you're looking for. I'm not a plumber, but I believe you can use these on a washer drain.

        http://www.lowes.com/pd_29145-...ng%2Bvent&facetInfo=


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 839 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        it's called generically a Studor vent, which probably grates on the Studor folks. being as the washer is a high-flow water generator, I'd mount it up a ways on a length of pipe of you go that route.

        they burp. and it is possible for the flapper to wear out, which would put water and sewer gas inside the wall. I'd say a vented access plate (return air vent plate) is a must.

        I will say our kitchen vent is inside an exterior wall in Da Frozen Nord, ya sure ya betcha then, Sven, and it works year around. I can't say the same for the (darn) drainpipe, those schmuck plumbers who did that, so if we forget to leave a cabinet door open, we can have fun during the holidays with hot water and drain cleaner.

        and if we leave the door open, the cats have fun we don't want them to have.

        this year I'm going to set a 40 watt bulb inside the cabinet in the disposer outlet on a cheater plug, and see if we have our usual issue during a big family dinner...

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5815 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        the studer vent as swschrad suggest is what you need.
        altho...i am against them 100%.. they can stick open and fill your house with a most oderrifferious smell
        and the gas it omits is combustable....but..they are legal..so i cant say no..but if it were my home
        i would run a vent up, over and out the roof
        sorry to say this but....
         
        Posts: 4048 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I am pleased to report that all my drains are vented. the basement shower, alas, is vented by the 6-foot rule, but there's too much floor to rip up and too much sand to dig for me to have dealt with that before I put in the heated floor.

        it works, and it's grandfathered, and I haven't even had to dump a bucket of water in there every week.

        I had a little mishap with the vent when I redid the upstairs bathroom... just capped a T that was there to the old tub location. well, just so you know, vents drain water back down, and the bugger froze off. so I had to go up there in 0 degrees and put on a couple of sweep-45s so that ain't NEVER going to happen again.

        the good thing about venting is you only get nasty dirty once, at the bottom, when you fix it.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5815 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        just a little tip for ya'll in the frozen tundra
        its called heat strip, or heat tape. or snow melt
        its a heated cable, if you have a pipe that freezes on you. drop one of those bad boys down in it...during the winter mths
         
        Posts: 4048 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        it's ABS pipe. heating strips have been known to short and the hot spots have started roof fires. mostly from bad installation, driving the staples tight.

        I should get some relief whenever I cut an access panel into a bulkhead. we also insulated thoroughly behind the drain line. the house was generally built well. then the apprentices' kids got the weekend to try and build out the basement. I found so much wrong down there I almost wanted to apply for a dynamite permit.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5815 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Frodo:
        just a little tip for ya'll in the frozen tundra
        its called heat strip, or heat tape. or snow melt
        its a heated cable, if you have a pipe that freezes on you. drop one of those bad boys down in it...during the winter mths



        Heat strips are one product that I have never nor will ever install in any way shape or form. Those things burn down building way to often for my comfort. Confused


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1535 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Frodo, when you refer to "heat strip, or heat tape. or snow melt its a heated cable", and Swschrad and CW, when you refer to a "heat strip", you're not talking about the same cables that are attached to roofs to prevent ice dams, are you?

        I wouldn't think these types of strips could be put in plumbing lines, but I have used the roof heating cables and plan to have them installed again, so I want to be sure I'm not endangering myself or my house.

        Is it just when the cables are stapled too tightly to the roof that they become dangerous? As I remember the kit I bought has special wired gizmos for attaching them. It's been decades ago so I don't remember for sure though.

        Thanks for any clarifications.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1926 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        when a heating element of any type runs out of the desired stuff to heat, it gets too hot. when it gets too hot, unpleasant things happen. insulation breakdown. shorts. a short makes the live section heat even more. in the end, the insulation burns if there isn't anything else. in my extended family, we've had two oven elements melt through and, ah expand uncontrollably with noticeable effects, in two houses. I almost had quite the accident with an immersion heater in a all-plastic film developing line back in my TV days.

        so I've always been a little leery of them. triple that down a non-metal pipe. times ten and doubled. consider uninspected general-purpose heaters of any type something like a fine pet cobra... don't trust the things totally.

        kind of like acid to clear a drain line. the older ones that gunk up solid are iron. they corrode out. cut out and repair one full of needles and diseased crud in a hospital room where you have no place to move the patient, and you decide quick you're not going to be part of the problem the rest of your life.

        all the terms refer to the same thing. there are maybe a dozen types for the purpose.

        I'd rather climb the ladder and chip ice than use one. there's always pantyhose full of rock salt... and no jokes about whether it itches, I'm one step ahead of you :-D

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: swschrad,


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5815 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Swschrad, I'm not sure if I'm following you.

        The roof heating cables are not always on; they're plugged in only when needed, then unplugged. There would be no period of heat being generated when the cables aren't heating ice. Assuming they're properly insulated (perhaps a big assumption if they're made in China), is there another risk besides that generally of using electric devices?

        I'm sorry to learn of your bad experiences; sounds like you had some close calls, especially with the oven. Was this a gas or electric oven? Was the oven in use at the time of the fire?

        I certainly am aware of space heaters; they've caused a lot of fires, sometimes due to improper use.

        I would rather NOT climb a ladder in Michigan and chip ice; Frown it's too dangerous, especially on frozen ground, especially for older bones that could break more easily with a fall.

        I know nothing about pantyhose full of rock salt, but it does sound like an amateur Ninja weapon that I could carry in the car for protection.

        Other than that, I'm not sure I want to hear about any other experiences you've had with pantyhose. Big Grin

        And any woman who's worn them can confirm they're not comfortable. A friend once described the process of wearing pantyhose as being hermetically sealed in synthetics. That's pretty accurate.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1926 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        the reference is to fill old pantyhose with rock salt (or nitrogen fertilizer if you have plantings around the house) and lay them on the roof on the ice dam. when the appropriate transition temperature is reached on the roof, the salt starts melting the ice.

        you still need the ladder.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5815 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Swschrad, thanks for the explanation.
         
        Posts: 1926 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        sparky is correct using the wrong cable in the wrong place will start a fire
        a heat strip is for heating in the home
        under a floor or in a wall
        ice melt / snow melt is a cable that is theromastat controled. you can install it on the roof or in your gutters. and down spouts.its thick, and designed to be heated. it is also water proff, you can drop t down a down spout or roof drain

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Frodo,
         
        Posts: 4048 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Frodo, I should be okay then as I only use the roof specified heating cables to melt the ice buildup. Thanks to all of you for the clarifications.
         
        Posts: 1926 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I know nothing of the systems, but, I would think that there are thermostatically ways to control the heat
         
        Posts: 2571 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        yes. 110 volt t-stat mounted outside, on the wall or roof
         
        Posts: 4048 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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