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        Orangeburg/Tar Paper Piping Sign In/Join 
        posted
        Next month my husband and I will be closing on a 1969 ranch style house here in San Anglo, TX. During the inspection we discovered toilet paper outside the house by the sewage line where there may have been some back up. After we called in a plumber it was discovered that the house has Orangeburg sewage piping. Some research has let us know that the tar paper piping was common in the area prior to the 1970s. The piping is basically made out of paper and tar and was the cheap option, but it was only suppose to last 50 years in "ideal" conditions. Apparently a lot of houses are now reaching the end of the piping lifespan and are having to dig up their entire sewage line from the house to the city main.
        We are going ahead with buying the house but in order to save a lot of money we want to dig up the line ourselves and only pay a plumbing company to come out and install the new PVC line.
        We also have a large mesquite tree 8 feet away from the line (which has caused some sewage trouble as well) and we plan to cut that down and dig up the stump around the same time.
        Neither of us has taken on a ground project this big (plumber said the line runs 60 feet long and 2 feet deep). My question is: What is the best way to approach digging up this line? I've been told we can rent a "Ditch Witch" from Lowes/Home Depot and the job would be easier. We want to go as little days without working sewage as possible.
        Has anyone else had their Orangeburg piping replaced or dug up their own lines for replacement?


        Tiffany
         
        Posts: 1 | Registered: Mar 19, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        by time you rent the ditch witch, and spend time without an operating sewer system, plus whatever hand digging you may do, you're going to spend more overall than if you had contracted the job out
        I would get a beer and sit in the shade and watch the pros do the work, but lots of luck if you DIY
         
        Posts: 2584 | Location: florida | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        Ditch witch{s} work well for conduit work but you will need a wider dig to stand in and install the PVC, as in renting a back hoe. Having said that I to would hire this out as nona posted. It may take quite the time to get the hang of a proper dig, thus losing money and adding aggravation.


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1576 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        it's a half day at worst for pros. they'll line up the permits, inspector, equipment and operator, and be in and out. while they're in there, perhaps you should rerun the water line, too. look at the meter and see what is coming out of the slab. if it's steel or lead, replace it while they have the trench cut.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5849 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        one...two....three....OK, I'll be #4

        Hire it out. By the time you rent a small backhoe, get it delivered and figure out how to run it a pro will be packing up and going home. While this kind of work runs in the $55 to $75/hr range you will have to pay a minimum fee but with shopping around for this small of a project you can probably get it done for $200.

        Bottom line, renting the equipment yourself for a full day will cost you the same or more than renting a pro for the half day or less it will take him. Digging with too small equipment will just make it drag on and on.

        Search around a little and find a guy who typically does this kind of work every day. Most plumbers will either do this if they have the equipment or will know who to call.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10477 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of CommonwealthSparky
        posted Hide Post
        [QUOTE]Originally posted by swschrad:
        it's a half day at worst for pros. they'll line up the permits, inspector, equipment and operator, and be in and out. while they're in there, perhaps you should rerun the water line, too. look at the meter and see what is coming out of the slab. if it's steel or lead, replace it while they have the trench cut.[/QUOTE

        In our region water lines and sewage must be two separate runs. Excavators have no problem with that for sure. Big Grin


        Popeye only reached for the Spinach can as a last resort...
         
        Posts: 1576 | Location: Central Pennsylvania | Registered: Jun 02, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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