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        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        a septic tank needs to be feed it is a living thing
        in side a healthy septic tank there are "bugs" that eat the fecal matter. you should not drain into a tank any chemicals. it kills the bugs
        you should use only septic friendly toilet paper i think the brand is scott. it says on the front septic safe. the paper needs to be able to be absorbed into the tank.
        if at all possible, route your gray water fixtures [tub,hand sink,washer, kitchen sink IF no disposal
        ] around /bypass the tank and tie directly into the outlet side of tank.
        this will keep your tank from getting chemicals in it soap,pine sall etc. feed your tank at least every other mth you can get septic treatment at the store or just pour a packet of yeast in the toilet flush
        for the op...if your tank is overflowing after 2 years from being cleaned out. you got a problem
        it could be that the co that emptied the tank just pumped out the water, and not the sludge
        you gotta use a mud pump not a water pump
        or and this is most likely its full of crap and paper because the "bugs" died and nothing ate the bacteria/fecal matter you gotta feed the bugs
        go to a hardware store and get a qt of "septic shock treatment" its a qt of bugs maybe it can be brought back/saved..


        https://www.youtube.com/*****?v=vn7bkncf1_E
         
        Posts: 3843 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Frodo,
        While a common practice routing gray water directly into the leaching field is against the law.

        A well maintained septic tank can handle gray water. The bacteria to handle digesting the solids is present in the solids and doesn't need to be added.

        Here is a good primer on Septic Tank systems and their maintenance. It is by NCSU so they're not trying to sell you products or services that aren't needed.

        http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/publi...Soilfacts/AG-439-13/


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 597 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Frodo
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Sparky617:
        Frodo,
        While a common practice routing gray water directly into the leaching field is against the law.




        not here in mississippi, florida,texas. maybe where you are is. we are governed by the UPC

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: Frodo,


        https://www.youtube.com/*****?v=vn7bkncf1_E
         
        Posts: 3843 | Location: I live in southern mississippi | Registered: Jun 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I know it is illegal here and in PA where I grew up. I can't speak to the entire country. The OP should check with their local code inspectors before doing any changes to their plumbing.

        The NCSU website I linked to had some good information on how a septic system works and how to maintain it.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 597 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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