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        Spot Cleaning Carpet & other handy uses for a wet dry vacuum Sign In/Join 
        posted
        More to move spam of the top of the board but anyway, a real post.

        If the dog or cat coughs up a hairball or dinner on the carpet this is how I clean it up. I grab our wet/dry vac in the wet mode. Suck up as much of the offending mess as possible. Then I use a mixture of water and white vinegar, soak the spot and then vacuum, repeat as needed. You can also do it with plain water.

        Next handy use. I see guys on TV shows pulling a toilet and bailing the water out of it. I just grab my handy wet dry vac and suck all the water (preferably clean) out of the bowl and tank. No bailing and no towels required.

        You have any good uses for your trusty wet dry vac?


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 610 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        yeah, the wet vac is dandy for toilet work. it beats carrying a sloshing toilet over to the shower, and turning it over once to empty everything.

        of course, you still have all that... stuff... in the filter to wash out....


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5483 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Conrad
        posted Hide Post
        Your toilet really has a filter???

        Oh, Big Grin You mean the shopvac filter!Big GrinBig Grin
         
        Posts: 6860 | Location: Plains and Mountains | Registered: Sep 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Apparently this is going to be the laughter thread of the day.

        Swschrad, your descriptive powers are, shall we say, inferentially graphic?

        My cheeks hurt already from laughing. This is better than some of the silly spam posts.
         
        Posts: 1737 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        I've never vacuumed out a clogged toilet. I think that would relegate the wet dry vac to other duties.

        I may have to try the liquid dish soap trick on a toilet clog sometime. I posted about that in the plumbing section.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 610 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Conrad
        posted Hide Post
        OOOOoooo! Glad you mentioned it.
        I had a clog in the basement toilet the other day. DS did it! (always important to assign blame, said my DH)
        Anyway it was the first time ever that the plunger was just not working for me, it slowly drained out, but as soon as one test flushed it, the water level came back up high. So I remembered reading about the liquid dish soap on one of these threads. I dumped about a cup of dish soap in when at the medium water level and left it. Came back in half an hour, plunged once and SUCCESS!
         
        Posts: 6860 | Location: Plains and Mountains | Registered: Sep 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Conrad,
        Very cool. A FB friend posted a link to it. I had never heard of doing it before.

        I would definitely be leary of putting hot water down the toilet. I would think just hot tap water would be enough, I certainly wouldn't take it anywhere close to boiling for fear of cracking the toilet.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 610 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Conrad
        posted Hide Post
        I didn't realize one was supposed to use hot water?
        It worked for me, just with the cold that was in the bowl. Guess the soap/detergent just makes the trap pathway slicker? Don't know what the temperature would have to do with that. Interesting thought though.
         
        Posts: 6860 | Location: Plains and Mountains | Registered: Sep 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        I've been wondering as well why soap is effective. Perhaps it's the grease cutting chemicals in the soap? I've also used Tide to clean the bathroom drains and found it surprisingly effective.
         
        Posts: 1737 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        The soap may help start breaking down the "bio-solids" polite speak for poo. Pouring a bucket of water quickly into the bowl, hot or cold can help dislodge a blockage as well. And unless you are really intellectually challenged you won't likely overflow the toilet in the process.

        GS,
        Are you putting liquid or powdered Tide in the bathroom drains? I struggle with keeping the gunk off the drain tail pipe between the sink and the trap. Shaving cream, toothpaste goo, soap scum and the rest like to cling to the PVC pipe. I've used baking soda and vinegar with some success and drain cleaner to clear it, but I'd love a non-toxic way, not that baking soda and vinegar is toxic. I've never had a clogged trap, the gunk is always between the trap and the drain.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 610 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of GardenSprite
        posted Hide Post
        Sparky, I've used both powdered and liquid Tid, having discovered the effect by accident when cleaning a cardiac life vest for my father. Instructions were to change and wash it every other day, and only with the Tide powder which came with the vest. I just figured there was some sweetheart branding deal cut between Tide and Zoll, manufacturer of the vest.

        But when I emptied the Tide water into the bathtub, I was surprised to see how it cleaned the tub, so I decided to try it on the gunk buildup. It worked well, but I switched to liquid Tide as I don't like powdered cleaners which release a certain amount of dust when they're used.

        Tide liquid was just as effective. Wondering if it was laundry detergent generally, I tried Purex, which is much cheaper than Tide. Didn't work. Back to the Tide.

        Probably the most impressive example was a backtub drain which at its worst took about 12 hours to drain ankle high water. I didn't want to call my plumber with all that water that I knew would be sloshing around and splashing all over when he plunged it.

        So I kept using Tide and eventually got the drain time down to 1/2 hour, then called my plumber.

        I don't know for sure that the blockages I cleared were above the trap, but I believe they were as I could see a lot of gunk when I looked down with a flashlight. All of the stuff you mentioned can clog up, especially soaps with high levels of moisturizer and creams. I've also noticed that certain shampoos also were worse for slowing down water drainage.

        Eventually I had to have all the waste lines cleaned (I had been living elsewhere for years and the plumbing just wasn't used frequently enough to maintain a free flow of water).

        I've also used baking soda and vinegar, primarily to kill drain flies. I know other women use them for that as well as just to keep them clean and minimize the gunk buildup.

        I've never tried them but I wonder if a filter would help stop some of the goo from getting down in your drains? Lint traps or panty hose on laundry hoses collect a lot of fuzz and stuff; seems like something specifically for sink drains could be effective as well. Or maybe they are and I just haven't gotten around to trying them.

        Hope this helps.

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: GardenSprite,
         
        Posts: 1737 | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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