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        Basement leaking during heavy rain Sign In/Join 
        posted
        I live in a quad level home and in the basement there are pipes coming out of the wall from a bathroom that's 1/2 floors above it. The sewage pipe runs in another pipe ( I assume this was done so they can run the sewage pipe after pouring the wall) and it's that pipe that the water comes in at. I don't know the correct terms for this type of construction but will try to add a picture later. Anyway, is there a way to fix it? Can I just fill that pipe with silicone or do I have to worry about water backing up into my bathroom?
        Thanks.
         
        Posts: 2 | Registered: Dec 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        need to know what kind of pipe that is, sorry to say. never fill one, determine what it is and remedy the issue.

        not common in homes, but there could be a rain leader from gutters or the roof that dumps into the drain, and that's EPA-illegal since the 80s or 90s. those would generally be 3 inch ID and up. that is an external fix, putting proper downspout on and running downhill away from the house.

        they could be vent pipes for the plumbing, generally 1-1/2 to 2 inch ID, and those are necessary and code-required to connect from drains to get sewer gas outside through the roof.

        any pipe protruding through the roof needs to be properly flashed out to keep rain from running down the pipe. this is the most likely fault, dead rusty flashing, or improperly installed, or totally missing with some fly-by-night having just run a ring of tar mastic around the hole and getting out of Dodge before anybody found out. those are easily fixed by a competent roofer.

        if they are old galvanized iron or cast iron, they could be rusted through, and need replacement.

        somebody with knowledge... a plumber, contractor, quality handyman with a license and insurance... needs to check this out.

        pictures might help, but frankly I doubt it. you need to size and identify the pipe before we can be any help.


        sig: if this is a new economy, how come they still want my old-fashioned money?
         
        Posts: 5492 | Location: North Burbs, MN | Registered: Mar 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        Could be that a larger pipe was installed during construction of the foundation to allow the sewage pipe to be placed through the foundation wall. If it's a pipe within a pipe and the larger pipe just ends flush or near flush with the foundation wall then you can fill the space between the two pipes.

        That's the good news. The bad news is that just filling the gap with silicon may not be enough to stop the leak. It's probably worth a try, but if there is any amount of water on the outside if will probably still leak. Exterior water leaks need to be solved from outside. This may be as simple as cleaning gutters and directing downspouts away from the house, regrading to keep water from pooling near the foundation or more serious fixes like digging out and adding waterproofing and drains.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10127 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by Jaybee:
        Could be that a larger pipe was installed during construction of the foundation to allow the sewage pipe to be placed through the foundation wall. If it's a pipe within a pipe and the larger pipe just ends flush or near flush with the foundation wall then you can fill the space between the two pipes.

        That's the good news. The bad news is that just filling the gap with silicon may not be enough to stop the leak. It's probably worth a try, but if there is any amount of water on the outside if will probably still leak. Exterior water leaks need to be solved from outside. This may be as simple as cleaning gutters and directing downspouts away from the house, regrading to keep water from pooling near the foundation or more serious fixes like digging out and adding waterproofing and drains.


        I think this is the case that it was used to allow the sewage pipe to be placed thru the wall. The house was built in the 60s. Was this a common practice back then?
        I never noticed water pooling around the foundation wall but I will further investigate and also check the gutters and downspouts for clogs. Maybe even grade the yard in the spring. Thank you.
         
        Posts: 2 | Registered: Dec 21, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        It's a common technique even now. Most houses have a few thru-foundation needs, installing a path in advance is easier the cleaner then trying to drill through after the fact.

        If you are pretty sure that this is what the larger pipe is for, then I would go ahead and get it as dry as possible (use a hairdryer) and then pump it full of silicon. Beyond that, a large % of foundation leaks are caused by overflowing gutters or by downspouts that are dumping water too close to the house. Fairly easy and not very expensive to clean out the gutters and add a 10' section of corrugated black plastic pipe to each downspout. For now you can install the pipe and just lay it on the surface. If it proves to be the solution, you can bury it in the spring.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10127 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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