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            DIY Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Home Improvement  Hop To Forums  Windows, Walls & Doors    Flashing a new construction window -- detail re: house-wrap & trim
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        Flashing a new construction window -- detail re: house-wrap & trim Sign In/Join 
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted
        Hello,

        I've watched videos and read instructions on installing a new construction window. I think I'm going to use FlexWrap for the sill (even tho it's really expensive) and straight wrap for the sides and head. Is that a reasonable choice?

        The instructions I've seen show the sill flashing applied directly to the sheathing, but the side flashing and sometimes the head flashing are applied over the house wrap. That doesn't make sense to me. It seems you'd want to flash all sides to the sheathing so that any water that gets under the house-wrap isn't trapped at the window fin.
        Also, I know JayBee does not like this, but most of the instructions I've seen do not flash over the bottom flange. I've even seen a Matt Risinger video where he shims behind the bottom flange and leaves it open. What are your thoughts on it?

        The existing windows in my house have a drip cap OVER the side trim. All the instructions I've seen so far have the drip cap directly over the window. How do I flash the head when the drip cap is above the outer trim?

        One other "special" case is that I will have to replace my house-wrap next year when I replace the siding. I've temporarily put the old cedar shingles up--which has riddled the house-wrap with nail holes. I'm thinking that the best I'll be able to do is leave about 6 inches of the old wrap in place around the windows then, when I install the new wrap next year, I'll tape to the old wrap. Do you have any other ideas of what I might do to better prepare for replacing the wrap after the windows and trim have been installed?

        I know there are a lot of details involved, so I apologize for this multi-question post. I don't want to goof this up so I appreciate your guidance and opinions.

        Thanks in advance.
         
        Posts: 304 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        quote:
        Originally posted by SturdyNail:
        Hello,

        I've watched videos and read instructions on installing a new construction window. I think I'm going to use FlexWrap for the sill (even tho it's really expensive) and straight wrap for the sides and head. Is that a reasonable choice?

        Go with the flex wrap or equivalent on all sides of the window. i use a similar Pella product sold at Lowe's - 50 feet for $20. http://www.lowes.com/pd_147316...ow%2Bwrap&facetInfo=

        The instructions I've seen show the sill flashing applied directly to the sheathing, but the side flashing and sometimes the head flashing are applied over the house wrap. That doesn't make sense to me. It seems you'd want to flash all sides to the sheathing so that any water that gets under the house-wrap isn't trapped at the window fin.
        Also, I know JayBee does not like this, but most of the instructions I've seen do not flash over the bottom flange. I've even seen a Matt Risinger video where he shims behind the bottom flange and leaves it open. What are your thoughts on it?

        WOW! I'm getting referenced in questions now - I'm honored. Remember that the house wrap is there to protect the house from moisture, not as a flashing for windows and doors. Wrap the house wrap through the window RO So that the framing and sheathing gets all the benefits of having house wrap. Then, use your flex wrap to make a great seal between the window flange and the housewrap. Finally , add your trim or siding to cover it all. If you are getting water behind your house wrap then you have a whole different set of problems than how your windows are flashed. As to the bottom, sure - it's much less likely to leak there, especially if the drip edge leads correctly into the under-window trim or siding. At the same time, at 40 cents a foot you are spending only an extra dollar or two to seal the bottom edge of your window. Boils down to there being no benefit to leaving it open (other than less cost) vs possible saving a major repair in the future. Technically, both methods are correct.

        The existing windows in my house have a drip cap OVER the side trim. All the instructions I've seen so far have the drip cap directly over the window. How do I flash the head when the drip cap is above the outer trim?

        Not sure if I have the right picture here but for some flat trims (or even brick molding) you should still install a flashing piece under the first run of siding. Otherwise there is nothing to keep water from running off the bottom edge of the siding and underneath the trim.

        One other "special" case is that I will have to replace my house-wrap next year when I replace the siding. I've temporarily put the old cedar shingles up--which has riddled the house-wrap with nail holes. I'm thinking that the best I'll be able to do is leave about 6 inches of the old wrap in place around the windows then, when I install the new wrap next year, I'll tape to the old wrap. Do you have any other ideas of what I might do to better prepare for replacing the wrap after the windows and trim have been installed?

        Other than pulling the windows back out to completely install new house wrap, I see no better option other than your plan. Leave enough wrap exposed around all sides of the window so you have plenty of room to tape the new wrap to the old. And make sure you use a house wrap tape.

        I know there are a lot of details involved, so I apologize for this multi-question post. I don't want to goof this up so I appreciate your guidance and opinions.

        On the plus side, by the time you finish rehabbing this house you'll be hang out your shingle as a GC!

        Thanks in advance.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10356 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        Thanks Jaybee,

        Regarding not flashing over the bottom flange, I think the reasoning is that any moisture that made it in to the window could weep out under the bottom flange. I know your point too about a higher likelihood of water from power washers etc... getting into the window through an un-flashed bottom flange.

        Regarding the flashing piece under the first run of siding (and over the trim), it sounds like you'd adhere that to the house-wrap. In the videos I've seen, they cut back the wrap at the top, adhere the peel and stick flashing to the head flange and the sheathing, then adhere the drip cap, then fold the house-wrap back down over that. You don't like cutting the house-wrap at the head and folding it over the flashing, correct?

        Regarding hanging out a shingle as a GC, the thought does appeal to me, but I'm afraid it's a bit too late for me to be changing careers. Besides, as slow as I work, I would certainly go broke Smile

        Thanks again.
         
        Posts: 304 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        The reason I say to flash on top of the house wrap is to keep the house wrap doing it's main purpose -encasing as much of the house as possible. Not only is it not necessary to use the house wrap as flashing but doing so increases the chances of the house wrap failing as you have made a new potential area for moisture to get behind the wrap. Plus, the wrap makes a great surface to seal flashing to, flashing that then in turn is covered by siding to shed water away. Flashing sealed to wrap correctly is an almost perfect seal - no need to cut the wrap to get the flashing up underneath.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10356 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        posted Hide Post
        Any new pictures to share on the project?

        Also a spam bump.


        General Disclaimer

        Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

        My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.
         
        Posts: 746 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of SturdyNail
        posted Hide Post
        I've removed one of the old wood windows and was hoping for an easy install of the new vinyl, but that was not to be. Biggest problem is that I overestimated the width of my rough opening by about 1/2". I bought a jamb extension with the window which is attached with screws through a thin strap, so I lost a touch of the normal 1/2 play. So, it doesn't fit! Good thing my wife bought a reciprocating saw for me for my birthday. I'll be firing that up on Sunday to shave some lumber off the sides.

        The other problem is related to the flashing. It looks like the carpenter who installed the original windows tried to shape some pitch into the window sill plate, but it looks like [s]he tried to do it with a spoon.

        I need to explain a little bit about the attached picture. We're looking at the sill plate from inside the house. The window is boarded up for the night.

        Sparky617--that pic's for you Smile

        So, my question is, can I cover that rough plate with my Flex Wrap, or should I put something over it to smooth it out some?

        This message has been edited. Last edited by: SturdyNail,

        Roughly shaped window sill plate
         
        Posts: 304 | Location: Western NewYork | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
        Picture of Jaybee
        posted Hide Post
        If you can fit your replacement window in on top of the existing plate then go ahead and do so. Your only concern is if the new window can fit and be flashed, whatever is underneath it will no longer be seen and will not matter. You can cover up all kinds of ugly, just don't cover up rot.


        Jaybee
         
        Posts: 10356 | Location: Knoxville, Tennessee | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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